Search Results for: Camino

Coming Soon | A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino [Free Webinar, this Saturday (July 18, 2020)]

In this webinar, I will show images from my walk on the Camino de Santiago in 2018 and on the Camino de Portuguese in 2019. I’ll share stories from my adventures on the Camino, discuss logistics, and talk about the history of these fabled pilgrimage routes.

My presentation will examine the meaning of pilgrimages and why pilgrimages have been important to my life and work. Committing to pilgrimages has helped me approach the ineffable in my art.

You must register for this free webinar via Zoom!

What: A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino | Free Webinar Presentation

When: Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 11am PT. Duration between one and two hours, including Q&A

Where: On your computer or mobile device from anywhere via Zoom. This is a free webinar, but Zoom authenticated registration is required for enrollment. The link for free enrollment is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_srnAIs9uSAiarUHQqIy-MA.

Garden along the Camino © Harold Davis

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a bestselling author of many books, including Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook, which can now be pre-ordered. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Meeting of the Ways © Harold Davis

You must register for this free webinar via Zoom!

Posted in Photography

Announcing: A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino | Free Webinar Presentation

What: A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino | Free Webinar Presentation

When: Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 11am PT. Duration between one and two hours, including Q&A

Where: On your computer or mobile device from anywhere via Zoom. This is a free webinar, but Zoom authenticated registration is required for enrollment. The link for free enrollment is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_srnAIs9uSAiarUHQqIy-MA.

Details: In this presentation, Harold will show images from his walks on the Camino de Santiago in 2018 and on the Camino de Portuguese in 2019. He will share stories from his adventures on the Camino, discuss logistics, and talk about the history of these fabled pilgrimage routes.

Harold’s presentation will examine the meaning of pilgrimages, why pilgrimages have been important to him and his work, and discuss how committing to pilgrimages has helped him approach the ineffable in his art.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Meeting of the Ways © Harold Davis

Number of Seats and Tuition: This is a free webinar, but it does require prior registration. Seating (on a first come, first served basis) is limited. You must register via Zoom to be enrolled in this webinar! The link for free enrollment is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_srnAIs9uSAiarUHQqIy-MA.

A lightly-edited recording of this Webinar will be posted following a time delay on our YouTube channel, Harold Davis Photography.

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a bestselling author of many books, including Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook, which can now be pre-ordered. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Posted in Photography

A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino

What: A Pilgrim’s Tale: Walking on the Camino | Free Webinar Presentation

When: Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 11am PT. Duration between one and two hours, including Q&A

Where: On your computer or mobile device from anywhere via Zoom. This is a free webinar, but Zoom authenticated registration is required for enrollment. The link for free enrollment is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_srnAIs9uSAiarUHQqIy-MA.

Details: In this presentation, Harold will show images from his walks on the Camino de Santiago in 2018 and on the Camino de Portuguese in 2019. He will share stories from his adventures on the Camino, discuss logistics, and talk about the history of these fabled pilgrimage routes.

Harold’s presentation will examine the meaning of pilgrimages, why pilgrimages have been important to him and his work, and discuss how committing to pilgrimages has helped him approach the ineffable in his art.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Meeting of the Ways © Harold Davis

Number of Seats and Tuition: This is a free webinar, but it does require prior registration. Seating (on a first come, first served basis) is limited. You must register via Zoom to be enrolled in this webinar! The link for free enrollment is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_srnAIs9uSAiarUHQqIy-MA.

A lightly-edited recording of this Webinar will be posted following a time delay on our YouTube channel, Harold Davis Photography.

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a bestselling author of many books, including Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook, which can now be pre-ordered. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

The Scallop Shell Symbol on the Camino

If you’ve walked the Camino de Santiago, you’ll have followed a route marked with scallop shell symbols. Along with many other pilgrims, I have a scallop shell hanging from my pack to let others know I am walking a Camino. Walking along, I keep my eye out for the scallop shell symbol, and note cafes, albergues, and other services that use the scallop shell as a sign that these places are hospitable and friendly to itinerant pilgrims.

But when you think about it, the scallop shell seems like an odd symbol to represent the path of the Camino, the most traveled pilgrimage route in all of christendom. The scallop shell seems distinctly peculiar as a christian or Catholic symbol when we have come to expect a crucifix, or perhaps the Madonna.

Scallop Shell Symbol on the Side of the Cathedral of Santiago © Harold Davis

So where did the scallop shell symbol come from? If you look at the history of the Catholic church, it is very common for pagan beliefs and symbolism to be absorbed and incorporated into doctrines and practices. The adoption of the scallop shell symbol is a prime example.

Back in the times of the Greeks and Romans, the scallop shell was a symbol of the Goddess Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans (think of the famous Birth of Venus painting by Botticelli). In the Roman era, an important ritual began at the Temple of Venus near the forum in Rome, and continued in some cases with a spiritual journey to the Atlantic coast of Galicia. This ritual journey was indicated and marked with the scallop shell symbol.

This journey encompassed fertility rituals invoking Venus along the way, and was also sacred to the two-faced God, Janus. Janus was the God of beginnings, transitions, transformations, doors, and endings: all highly relevant to pilgrimages and pilgrims.

A gift of walking a Camino is the encounters and conversations with folks from all walks of life and many parts of the world who are looking out for each other. It is astounding to realize as one walks the Camino that one is part of a tradition the predates Christianity, and speaks to the common humanity and ability of all of us to get along together.

Scallop Shell Manhole © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography

Garden along the Camino

Someone had built this garden beside the trail in the nook beside an old stone wall, with its rose trellis across a small spring. Now, half wild, the garden was reclaiming its heritage—and like the ancient land of the Camino was part way reverted to its natural state.

Garden along the Camino © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography, Spain

Ponte Rodo-Ferroviária: Beginning My Camino Adventure

Today I walked across the Ponte Rodo-Ferroviária de Valença (shown in the image) across the River Minho from Tui in Galicia, Spain to Valenca in Portugal, and back again. Other than a little signage, just as you might have in the US when leaving one state and entering another, there was nothing to show that this was once an international border. The old customs house and port of entry building on the Portugal side had been converted into a small art center and a music academy. I think when all is said and done, with whatever problems there are, there is no going back to a divided Europe.

Ponte Rodo-Ferroviária de Valença © Harold Davis

Both sides of the river were heavily fortified starting in Roman times. I stood on the very top of the massive stone ramparts of the Portuguese walls and stared across the river at the fortified hilltop town of Tui, the capital of one of the seven provinces that merged to form the ancient kingdom of Galicia.

Tomorrow I start north on the famous Camino Portuguese trail. This pilgrimage trail leads to Santiago de Compostela through Galicia from the south, whereas the better known and more trafficked Camino Francais pilgrimage trail comes from the north. I should be in Santiago in a little less than two weeks, and I am looking forward to it very much, although my feet are already a little sore and a bit worried about the proposition!

Related story: My Camino adventure last year (2018) starts here.

Posted in Portugal, Spain

Camino de Santiago

Camino Seen via Hotel Room Interiors

Phyllis says that for her my Camino is visually a succession of hotel room interiors. This is because of the nine-hour time-shift with California. When she is sleeping, I am walking, and when she is going about her day I am sleeping. Our hours are close to orthogonal.

Old Wood Door with Blue Paint © Harold Davis

We FaceTime when I wake (her bedtime), I walk and she sleeps, and we usually touch base again after I’ve checked in, my late afternoon becoming her early morning. She sees my Camino essentially as different window treatments in the backgrounds of my screen: red curtains morph into lace, and then into green shutters, or a stone wall.

Letter Box © Harold Davis

By the way, these are hotels that cater to pilgrims. They are okay, some better than others, and all more than a little bit odd. So far, they’ve had the necessities: a bed and a shower and a “pilgrim’s dinner”.

Tree and Wine © Harold Davis

Posted in iPhone, Photography

Walking the Camino for Wild Camels

Today on the Camino I met Rosa, a zookeeper from Denmark. Rosa has walked the Camino from the French border to raise awareness and donations for wild camels. Wild camels are the eighth most endangered mammalian species, with less than 1,000 individuals surviving in northwest China and Mongolia.

You can click here to learn more about the wild camel cause, and here to learn more about Rosa’s walk (and to donate).

Posted in Photography

Better Weather on the Camino

I forgot to mention that yesterday’s story was written, and the images processed and uploaded, from the small bar across the street from my room. This was the only place with connectivity in the hamlet along the Camino that I was staying in. Furthermore, I got to plug my computer into a power outlet, and to warm my back against a radiator while the dark-eyed and buxom hostesses plied me with olives, fried doughnut things, and a clear Galician drink they described as “double fermented” that packed a wallop.

It was cold overnight, with a hard frost on the ground when I woke. After yesterday’s rain and hail, I was hoping for better weather on the Camino de Santiago. As it turned out, it was crisp but sunny with high, scudding clouds—perfect weather for walking.

The stone cross in the photo below is a cruceiro, examples of which are found all over the Galician countryside. Cruceiros are intended to ward off evil spirits of the dead, and protect travelers, although apparently drinking the double-fermented beverage I mentioned is also thought to help with this task, particularly if the drink is preceded by a brief prayer.

Cruceiro © Harold Davis

The yellow flowers in my next image are cultivated Rapeseed, from which Canola oil is pressed. (They really should change the name of this plant.) But Yellow! You can see what a wondrous day it has been!

Rapeseed Field © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography

First Day on the Camino

Yesterday was my first day hiking on the Camino de Santiago. I walked roughly twelve kilometers from Sarria to Morgade, a small hamlet.

Twelve kilometers is about seven miles, and it doesn’t sound like much. But I feel it!

It was really pleasant walking, with paths, country roads, high scuttling clouds, and intermittent chill and sunshine. The photo below of the Camino meeting a country lane gives the idea.

Meeting of the Ways © Harold Davis

As I expected, there were many fellow pilgrims on the trail. Mostly, they were Spanish, but some were from England, Sweden, and elsewhere. I’ve yet to meet any other Americans, but I have learned to say “Buen Camino” to everyone I meet on the way (it’s the ritual greeting specific to pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago).

Santiago de Barbadelo © Harold Davis

Besides the pastoral countryside, I passed through a number of hamlets, some of which were stocked with convenient expresso machines, and old historic buildings, like the Romanesque church from the twelfth century shown above.

At each of these stops whether for coffee or a church, the idea is to get my Credencial del Peregrino stamped, as proof that I have passed this way. You need two stamps a day to get your pilgrimage certificate in Santiago. Some locals take their stamping duties very seriously, and stamp, sign, and date my Credencial. Others are more like, here’s the stamp and a pad, go for it! I actually enjoy the process of getting my thingee stamped (I did this also on the Kumano Kodo pilgrimage trail in Japan and of course it makes a great souvenir and memory jogger).

Notes: In case you are wondering, my suitcase still hasn’t caught up to me. I miss my tripod, and I could use some clean underwear and socks (this may be TMI). Also, my legs have been cold on the trail, and I could use some warmer clothes. But otherwise, less is more, and I am not really very unhappy about this. Onward pilgrim!

This story wasn’t posted yesterday because the wi-fi connectivity wasn’t up to it. Today I have arrived in Portmarin, a bit more of a town, and am able to connect to the world.

Posted in Photography

Mellow Yellow

Yellow Lines © Harold Davis

Blue and Yellow Arrows on the Camino © Harold Davis

Spadix of a Calla Lily © Harold Davis

Yellow Spadix © Harold Davis

Yellow Tulips © Harold Davis

Wasp © Harold Davis

Road Trip © Harold Davis

Gazania Solar Flare © Harold Davis

Gazania Solar Flare © Harold Davis

Autumn Arbor © Harold Davis

Aisle of Sight © Harold Davis

Core of the Anemone © Harold Davis

Mondrian Car © Harold Davis

Morning in the Foothills © Harold Davis

Ocean Sunset © Harold David

Owens River Gorge © Harold Davis

Playing in the Rain © Harold Davis

Resurrection © Harold Davis

Yellow Dahlia on Black © Harold Davis

Yellow Roses (on scanned background) © Harold Davis

Yellow Vase and Blue Vase © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography

Harold Davis—Best of 2020

Obviously, 2020 has been a difficult year for everyone. It was also not the year it started out being for me. Let me explain. In February and March I was first in Yosemite, teaching in a workshop. Next I was in Death Valley, followed by Escalante, Utah and the country around Moab.

I’d noted a news item about a novel disease in China, but didn’t think it would have very much applicability to my life and work. Oh, how oblivious we mortals can be!

My plans were to get home from the southwest, stay a few weeks, then head to Europe to lead a workshop in southwestern France followed by a stint walking as a pilgrim on the Camino de Santiago. And so on.

Obviously, my travel plans did not come to pass. We’ve spent the rest of 2020 at home, sheltering-in-place. One of these days I hope to travel again. But in the meanwhile, 2020 has seen my own, personal artist-in-residency-at-home. Which has made for works capturing on a smaller scale than many of my best-of photographs from years gone by, but I think I found plenty to capture at home. On the whole, it has been a productive year for me.

My “Best Of” selections for prior years, going back to 2013, can be found here.

Hydrangea Blossoms and Rock Spiral © Harold Davis

Hydrangea Blossoms and Rock Spiral © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Skim Ice on the Merced © Harold Davis

Skim Ice on the Merced © Harold Davis

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Tulip Fandango © Harold Davis

Tulip Fandango © Harold Davis

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Folds in the Earth © Harold Davis

Folds in the Earth © Harold Davis

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Zabriskie View © Harold Davis

Zabriskie View © Harold Davis

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Eye of the Tower © Harold Davis

Eye of the Tower © Harold Davis

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Opening Train Bridge © Harold Davis

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Power Lines © Harold Davis

Power Lines © Harold Davis

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Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

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White Papaver Nudicaule Inversion © Harold Davis

White Papaver Nudicaule Inversion © Harold Davis

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Parfait Mandala 1 © Harold Davis

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Patterns in Glass 3 © Harold Davis

Patterns in Glass 3 © Harold Davis

Egg White © Harold Davis

Egg White © Harold Davis

Nemesia and Gaillardia © Harold Davis

Duo © Harold Davis

Duo © Harold Davis

Florabundance © Harold Davis

Honeysuckle © Harold Davis

Honeysuckle © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Dried Blossoms © Harold Davis

Dried Blossoms © Harold Davis

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Flowers from our Pandemic Garden © Harold Davis

Flowers from our Pandemic Garden © Harold Davis

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Brookside-Snowball Dahlia © Harold Davis

Brookside-Snowball Dahlia © Harold Davis

Let the sunshine in © Harold Davis

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Red Onion Slice © Harold Davis

Pear Slices © Harold Davis

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There's always one in every barrel! © Harold Davis

There’s always one in every barrel! © Harold Davis

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Apple Slice Playdate © Harold Davis

Metamorphosis © Harold Davis

Metamorphosis © Harold Davis

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Spiral of Flower Karma © Harold Davis

Spiral of Flower Karma © Harold Davis

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Bottled Light Study © Harold Davis

White Dahlia Inversion © Harold Davis

White Dahlia Inversion © Harold Davis

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Flowers are Multitudes © Harold Davis

Flowers are Multitudes © Harold Davis

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Serendipity with Sunflowers Inversion © Harold Davis

Bike Rack © Harold Davis

I hope you’ve enjoyed my images and the associated blog stories. For convenience, I’ve included a link below the image where I’ve written about it in my blog.

Most images available as prints. Please inquire. As of today, we are still running our Pandemic Print special.

Check out my self-selected bests from previous years in Best Images Annuals!

Posted in Best Of

Exploring the World with Harold Davis [Free Webinar]

What: Exploring the World with Harold Davis [Free Webinar]

When: Saturday November 28, 2020 at 11:00am PT. Duration between one and two hours, including Q&A

Where: On your computer or mobile device from anywhere via Zoom. This is a free webinar, but pre-registration is required. Seating is limited. The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_74DAeD-rTeCY6ugjeNkuHQ

Details: From the grand caves of Southeast Asia to the pilgrimage trails of Spain and Japan, from the castles of historical Europe to the vast wilderness of North America, Harold Davis has been there with his camera. In this webinar, Harold will share his photographs and stories from wilderness adventures, Son Doong cave in Vietnam, the Kumano kodo and Camino de Santiago trails, and much more.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Who should attend: This webinar will delight armchair travelers, and those who would like to get out and about, even if only virtually. In addition, you will get ideas about how to become a better traveler photographer, and some research about possible bucket-list destinations for when we can travel safely again.

Son Doong Cave © Harold Davis

Number of Seats and Tuition: This is a free webinar, but pre-registration is required. Seating (on a first come, first served basis) is limited. You must register via Zoom to be enrolled in this webinar! The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_74DAeD-rTeCY6ugjeNkuHQ

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a bestselling author of many books, including most recently Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

The Making of Creative Garden Photography | Free Webinar

Our new book Creative Garden Photography has been at least ten years in the making from conception to finished production files. In this free webinar, on Sunday July 5, 2020 at 11am PT, Phyllis and I will be joined by Rocky Nook associate publisher Ted Waitt. We’ll take a look at the images in the book, the ideas behind the book, the techniques the book covers, some of the stories told in the book, book production, how the book design relates to garden design as well as photography, and answer questions from the audience. A discount code for book and eBook purchases from the publisher will be provided.

The webinar is free, but registration in advance is required. Click here to register for the Creative Garden Photography webinar.

We have a number of technique webinars coming up that I hope you’ll find useful. You can find the complete list of webinars by clicking here, and below. Recordings of our past webinars can be found in the Harold Davis Photography YouTube channel. You’ll also find live events (I don’t currently have any scheduled until 2021 due to the pandemic) on this page.

I am particularly excited to be sharing stories and images from the Camino de Santiago on Saturday, July 18. This is a free webinar, but requires registration. Click here for more info.

  • Printing, Proofing, and all about Paper with Moab Masters Scott Barrow, Harold Davis, and Jim Graham [Benefits Equal Justice Initiative] | Thursday September 24, 2020 at 10am PT click here for registration. Seats are limited. Click here for details.
  • Master Photographer Panel with Jennifer King and Alan Shapiro, moderated by Harold Davis [Benefits NAACP] | Saturday October 10, 2020 at 11am PT click here for registration. Seats are limited. 
  • Master Photographer Panel with Anne Belmont and Bryan Peterson, moderated by Harold Davis [Benefits Center for Policing Equity] | Saturday November 14, 2020 at 11am PT click here for registration. Seats are limited. 
Giverny Afternoon © Harold Davis

Giverny Afternoon © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography, Writing