Search Results for: ranunculus

Rainy Day Ranunculus

Rainy Day Ranunculus

Rainy Day Ranunculus, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Briefly noted: Photographed in my garden in an intermission in the rain, this is the same plant I used as a model in this studio Ranunculus shot.

Take your pick: au naturel versus handsome artifice. Personally, I like my flowers both ways. Thank you very much.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Ranunculus Petals

Ranunculus Petals in White

Ranunculus Petals in White, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

I photographed this white Ranunculus bud on a black velvet background (above) and on a transparent white background generated using a light box (below). The white background was inverted to make the blackground black.

Actually, I like the monochromatic version best.

Random Ranunculus facts: every Ranunculus is different, no two buds are the same, even on the same plant; buttercups are part of the Ranunculaceae family.

Related image: Ranunculus Asiaticus.

Spiral Ranunculus

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Posted in Flowers, Photography

Monochromatic Ranunculus

Monochromatic Ranunculus

Monochromatic Ranunculus, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Sometimes old-fashioned black and white works best. Not that there’s anything really old-fashioned about digital monochromatic imagery. As I explain in Creative Black & White: Digital Tips & Techniques, monochrome in the digital era amounts to a simulation. For the most part, I avoid grayscale files—my black and white digital images are saved and reproduced using RGB or CMYK color.

As with the Ranunculus Asiaticus, this shot was taken down on black velvet. I combined five captures in post-processing using hand-HDR techniques. Each exposure was made on tripod using my 85mm macro lens at f/21 and ISO 100, with shutter speeds from 1/6 of a second to 1/60 of a second.

I converted the color Photoshop image to simulated monochromatic using Nik’s Silver Efex Pro filter plug-ins, and used Silver Efex to add a small amount of virtual selenium toning.

Posted in Flowers, Monochrome, Photography

Ranunculus Asiaticus

Ranunculus Asiaticus

Ranunculus Asiaticus, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

The Ranunculus plant came home with me for the garden. But first I snipped this bud. I photographed the blossom straight down in a small vase wrapped in black velvet using my 85mm perspective-correcting macro at a moderate aperture (f/16 by the lens, with an effective aperture of f/21).

The final result is a Photoshop composite (hand HDR) of three exposures, all shot on tripod at ISO 100: 0.1 second, 0.2 second, and 0.4 second.

Now in the garden, hopefully this plant will yield other blossoms for photography.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

White Ranunculus

White Ranunculus

White Ranunculus, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Before planted, I pruned this Ranunculus blossom, placed it in a thin vase, and surrounded the vase with black velvet. I used a special low tripod so I could get right in front of the flower with my macro lens; the image you see is the result of combining eight exposures.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl

Ranunculi is the plural of ranunculus and I think makes a better plural for this wonderful flower than “ranunculuses.” By whatever plural form, Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl forms the third of a trio of blossoms-in-a-blue-bowl imagery. The other two images are shown in Orchids in a Blue Bowl and Clematis in a Blue Bowl, and are also shown in this story beneath my ranunculi.

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl© Harold Davis

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Orchids in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Orchids in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Clematis in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Clematis in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Flowers for the vernal equinox

To celebrate the spring equinox yesterday, here are some Tulips and Anemones shot on my light box for translucency (a white ranunculus peeks through on the upper left as well!). You can recognize some of these specimens in Kaleidoscope of Flowers. As you can see, I am enjoying our California spring!

Tulips and Anemones © Harold Davis

Tulips and Anemones © Harold Davis

Exposure data: Nikon D800, Zeiss 135mm f/2 APO Sonnar, 2 seconds at f/16 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Kaleidoscope of Flowers

Spring has come, and I know it’s true because I have anemones and ranunculae to add to my tulips on my light box for back lighting. Fun to create a composition that seems almost like a kaleidoscope image—but the colors are made of flowers!

Kaleidoscope of Flowers © Harold Davis

Kaleidoscope of Flowers © Harold Davis

Exposure information: Shot on a light box with a Nikon D800 and Zeiss Otus 55/1.4. Seven combined exposures, each exposure at f/11 and ISO 100, with exposure times between 1/60 of a second and 2 seconds. Camera tripod mounted; Harold ladder mounted. Exposures combined and processed in Adobe Camera RAW (ACR), Photoshop, Nik HDR Efex Pro, Nik Color Efex Pro, Topaz Adjust and Topaz Simplify.

Related image: Tulips in a Crowd.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Floral Abundance

Floral Abundance

From my garden I cut some Papaver rhoeas, a single Papaver nudicaule, several varieties of Ranunculus, alstromeria in profusion, forget-me-nots, hardenbergia, a lupine, and a few Orlaya grandiflora “Minoan Lace” (an endangered wild flower originally from Crete).

I arranged these cut flowers on my large light box, and photographed straight down with my camera on a tripod using my 50mm Sigma f/2.8 macro lens.

This image was composed in Photoshop from six different exposures, each at f/10 and ISO 100. The range of shutter speed times was from 1/30 of a second (about what the light meter indicated) to 4 seconds (pinned to the right of the histogram as high-key).

I started layering this image, with the lightest exposure as the bottom layer, painting in the detail I wanted from each successively darker layer.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone and Bicycles

Anemone

Anemone, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This is a close-up of an anemone, a flower in the buttercup (Ranunculus) family named after the Greek word for wind.

Technically, there’s a good comparison to be made with my extreme wide angle Lupine along the Trail, because both photos are composites of two exposures. So I was going with a story title like “an anemone is to a wide angle as a fish is to a bicycle” until I realized the whole title was too complicated, wouldn’t fit in the space I have for titles, and conveyed the wrong thought. So please consider “Anemones and Bicycles” a compaction of all that, even though there are no bicycles evident.

I exposed the anemone at 1.3 seconds for the background of the flower, and then layered on top a 4 second exposure of the flower core.

[Nikon D300, 200mm f/4 macro lens (300mm in 35mm terms), two exposures (one at 1.3 seconds, one at 4 seconds), both f/36 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.]

Other anemone images: Anemone, Core of the Anemone, Anemone Japonica.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone

Anemones are members of the ranunculus family, and related to the buttercup. Taking a break from my task of working on my new book, Digital Light and Exposure, I couldn’t resist cutting some flowers from the garden, including dahlias and this anemone. With the cut flowers in water, I just had to photograph them. I used natural light in my studio, and classic high depth-of-field macro technique.

Related images: White Anemone, Anemone Japonica.

[85mm macro lens (127.5mm in 35mm terms, 36mm extension tube, 20 seconds at f/64 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.]

Anemones are said to be symbolic of memory, although I think this one looks more like an angel with wings and a burning core than a memory bank. In any case, the flower is apt for the day, 9/11. Few of us will forget the anniversary of an event that transfigured our world, and changed it for the worse. Here’s one of my photos, scanned from a slide, of the New York skyline before the Trade Towers came down.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Upside-Down, Face-Up Columbine

This columbine in my garden is unusual because it is upside down, for a columbine. Upside down for a columbine means that the flower faces up, rather than over and down like an elegant hat. One of the nicknames for this flower is “Granny’s Bonnet.” Hardly an elegant hat, and hardly an appropriate name when you are face up (upside-down, that is, for a columbine).

An upside-down columbine makes me happy, because it is easier to photograph. I can simply put the camera on my tripod, and aim down at the flower. I don’t have to lever myself underneath the flower. I can be any distance I’d like from the flower. And, upside-down columbines that face up move less than normal columbines—because the stems are stabler. This makes it easier to photograph them at small apertures for long time exposures, as I did in this photo (f/40).

A member of the widely varied, far-flung ranunculus family, the columbine seems paradoxically to have been used both to symbolize cuckoldry, and the innocence of the holy dove (columbine comes from the Latin word for dove). Flower of opposites, I like it best upside-down like the one in this photo, with secrets exposed to the world.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Flowers Forever

This is a round-up of some of my recent flower photographs in and around my garden.

The photograph above is of a cymbidium. Cymbidiums are orchids originally from the lower slopes of the Himalayas. They grow well outdoors here.

I photographed this cymbidium early this morning after an overnight rain. My cymbidiums are on our front porch. In the morning, they were in bright but overcast light. I was easily able to position my tripod with extension tube, macro lens, and +4 diopter close-up filter for a stopped-down aperture.

The new wisteria buds shown in the next two photographs hang over our garage. I photographed them yesterday hanging out of our living room window (for a moment there I was literally hanging, too!).

These photos are handheld, using a vibration reduction (VR) zoom and extension tube. They were brightly side-lit by yesterday’s late afternoon sun.

I think both photographs (but particularly the first one) are worth looking at larger.

Wisteria 1

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Wisteria 2

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The last photograph in this round-up is a young ranunculus bud. It’s kind of a weird photo: for an extremely close-in flower macro it has a lot going on. The flower also looks slightly X-rated to me, but that may only be me…

I photographed this flower a few days ago in Julian’s garden (Julian is my eight-year old) straight down on a tripod.

Young Ranunculus

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Posted in Flowers, Photography, Water Drops

Dawn in the Flower Forest

The last week or so I’ve been observing carefully how the sunrise lights up our garden. My idea was the capture the light of dawn within the scale of a small flower, like this tiarella. This flower is a member of the saxifrage family, and is low to the ground (maybe 3″ high from bottom to top). It is planted mostly in the shade where selective sun rays only hit it briefly.

Lying flat on the ground, coffee mug beside me, Julian and Nicky jumping over me, I waited patiently (more or less) for sunrise. The camera was handheld, with a vibration reduction lens at 200mm (300mm in 35mm terms). I used 12mm of extension tube and a +4 diopter close-up lens. As the sun hit the flower I snapped a whole series of photos that are about the play of light and depth of field.

Here are a couple of other recent photos that explore light and depth of field:

Wet Ranunculus in the Morning Sun

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Structure of the Trumpet Vine Flower

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By the way, I’m off to Yosemite tomorrow with Julian for some photography, and I have a great deal of other travel planned this month. So–excuses in advance–my photoblogging is going to be on the light side for a while. Then again, as Yoda might have said, the light side is the reverse of the dark side–and better!

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Do Opposites Attract?

Do opposites attract? How different can two people be? Do these two flowers really belong to the same family?

Leaving the first two questions out of it for the moment, I am bemused by the fact that both these two flowers in my garden are members of the ranunculus family.

Velvet Trap

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Posted in Bemusements, Flowers, Photography