Search Results for: Papaver

Papaver Rhoeas

It’s poppy time of year in my garden. I can’t resist a poppy, they are among my favorite flowers to photograph. Ephemeral and architected to respond to even slight wind (so motion is always an issue at the slower shutter speeds often used for macro work), poppies are not the easiest flowers to photograph. Stunning colors and a kind of naive lack of pretension (decorative poppies are no hothouse roses bred for commerce) makes the effort worth it.

Papaver Rhoeas

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With this Papaver rhoeas I intentionally underexposed to help me get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid the flower-in-motion problem. I shot at 1/800 of a second on a tripod with my 100mm macro lens fairly wide open at f/5.6 and ISO 200.

My idea was to get the center in focus, and to minimize the focus degradation across the rest of the flower by getting as parallel to the flower as possible.

Naturally, the histogram bunched to the left (I was underexposed by a couple of stops), but I was able to salvage this in the multi-RAW conversion process, with only a little extra noise.

Recent Papaver story: Salutation to the Sun; More poppies.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver Danebrog

This Papaver danebrog, or Poppy Danish Flag, is a species of Poppy Somniferum, or opium poppy, that I got from Annie’s Annuals.

The flower is pretty nice, and I photographed it with my shortest macro lens, a Sigma 50mm f/2.8 DG macro D.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver and Shadow

At first glance, one might think this image is a Photoshop composite of a black-and-white image and a color photo, but it is not a composite. It is a single photograph. This Papaver nudicaule (Icelandic Poppy) was gowing in a pot outside our front stairs. It rained the night before, and in the early morning. Then the sun came out. I took the photograph carefully, lens stopped down for depth of field, and exposing for the yellow flower because I knew I wanted the shadow area to go black. Then I processed the RAW file carefully a number of times for the flower, and with different color balance and exposure settings for the shadows. If you look carefully at the shadow areas, you can see that in fact they are not monochromatic, and tend toward the red side of things.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver Birth

It’s tough to catch a poppy in the moment of birth: turn around and the poppy has breached its pod and is a newborn flower. Not only that, poppies are low to the ground on a stalk that is extremely sensitive to any breeze. Fortunately, this Papaver nudicaule cooperated. The only cost: a little laughter from my kids who thought I looked silly hugging the ground with the camera low on a tripod.

Posted in Bemusements, Flowers, Photography

Harold Davis—Best of 2021

2021—a year that has truly lived up to “May you live in interesting times”! My “Best Of” selections for prior years, going back to 2013, can be found here. Onward and upward through the fog!

California Live Oak © Harold Davis

Corn Poppy © Harold Davis

Bouquet of Poppies from the Garden © Harold Davis

The Right to Assemble © Harold Davis

The Way Things Were © Harold Davis

Blowing in the Wind © Harold Davis

Papaver Pods © Harold Davis

A Hint of Color, Oxarafoss © Harold Davis

Haifoss Variation 4 © Harold Davis

Godafoss © Harold Davis

Lotus Flower © Harold Davis

Love is a Many Splendored Thing © Harold Davis

Dandelion Inversion © Harold Davis

Climbing Broccoli Mountain © Harold Davis

Autumn Roses © Harold Davis

Divertimento 1 © Harold Davis

Glass Shield © Harold Davis

White Peony © Harold Davis

Most images available as prints. Please inquire.

Check out my self-selected bests from previous years in Best Images Annuals!

Posted in Best Of

Sharing My Techniques for Photography on Black—Webinar on Saturday 11/20/21—There Are No Secrets

I’ll be sharing my techniques for Photography on Black in a live Zoom webinar on Saturday November 20, 2021 at 11am PT. The webinar will include real-time demonstrations of photography and post-production in Photoshop. There are no secrets! I’ve explained my techniques in my books; you can attend this webinar to see me actually do the work, with plenty of time for Q&A.

Click here for more info, and here to register on Zoom!

Papaver hybridium ‘Naughty Nineties’ © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography, Workshops

Running Photoshop 2021 in Emulation Mode on a Mac M1

I don’t these days write much about computers, and I also like to say (when asked) that the only software I have written in the last decade is my LAB Action for Photoshop. That said, computers and software are a fundamental part of digital photography. One ignores them at one’s peril, just as ignoring chemistry in the wet darkroom didn’t work very well for most serious photographers in the film era.

But I break with my relative deprecation of the topic of computers and software in this story because finding a simple answer to a basic problem important to photographers was painful, and took far too long. Maybe I can spare someone else the grief.

If you are in the Apple computing world, as many photographers are, you’ll likely know that Apple recently changed its underlying chip-set from an Intel-based processor to the Apple-designed M1 (“Apple Silicon”). I don’t want to make your eyes glaze over too much, but the M1 is based on a RISC design—if you are interested, you can read more about RISC here.

From the viewpoint of the end user, what you need to know is that applications—such as Photoshop—need to be re-written to run on the new design. Older programs written for the Intel chips will still run on an M1 computer, but they need to run in emulation mode using a program that Apple calls Rosetta

Emulation means a kind of translation program, from commands meant for one set of chips to the comparable commands that the other set of chips uses, in this case from Intel to Apple M1. At least in theory, there should be some negative performance consequences to running in emulation mode (because instructions are passing through an additional processing layer).

So, what does this all have to do with me? (Or you?) I’m glad you asked.

Personally, I am a bit of a troglodyte when it comes to upgrading my computer gear. I subscribe to the “if it ain’t broken, don’t fix it” school of life. But my old Macbook was definitely approaching the twilight years, and with the amount of presentation and travel in my calendar, a new laptop became compelling, and I went for an Apple MacBook Air that uses the new M1 chips.

So far so good. I migrated most of my old software over, and installed Photoshop 2021 from my Creative Cloud subscription. Photoshop ran just fine on the new computer, as you’d expect of software from a major vendor such as Adobe. But—try as I might—I couldn’t get my favorite third-party plugins—the Nik Collection from DxO, Topaz Studio, and On1 Software—to appear on the Photoshop Filters menu, or to run from within Photoshop.

Technical support from Adobe and the third-party vendors didn’t yield any helpful information (frustratingly, one of the vendors advised re-downloading the DMG file, and trying to install again, which did nothing). This dearth of information on the Internet about the very simple fix is what is leading me to write this article, and maybe spare you my frustration.

Put simply, Adobe may have re-written Photoshop to run in native mode on the M1, but the third-party vendors have not got there yet (if they ever do). For now, if you want the third-party software I mentioned from within Photoshop, the solution is to run Photoshop in Intel-emulation mode (with whatever performance hit this implies).

To do this on an M1 Apple computer, open a Finder window, and locate the Photoshop 2021 application. Right-click on the app icon, and select Get Info from the drop-down menu. When the Get Info window opens, check the Open using Rosetta box. The next time you start Photoshop, it will run in emulation mode, and you will see the legacy third-party applications on the Filter menu (they work just fine). It is that simple.

The broader question of whether (and when) these third-party applications will be rewritten for the M1 Apple Silicon, and whether they will then fit into Adobe’s nascent ecosystem of Plugins (a whole separate menu item and palette in Photoshop 2021) I am not really equipped to address at this point.

If you are interested in the Papaver pod images below, you can learn more about them in Have you ever seen a poppy seed up really close and personal? and Poppy Dancer and All Along the Watchtowers. Also, please keep our Workshops & Events in mind.

Ancient Towers 1 © Harold Davis

Ancient Towers 2 © Harold Davis

Posted in Hardware

Have you ever seen a poppy seed up really close and personal?

By way of background, check out Poppy Dancer and All Along the Watchtowers and the Papapver pod bouquet in Recent Images.

Looking at the close-up of the top of a Papaver pod in Crown of Papavers (below), I’d like to point a few things out. The ring of arches just below the “crown” is where fertilized poppy seeds come out once the pod is “ripe.” Somewhat like curtains, the “entrances” to the passages to the inside curl down. You can see these as curved pads below each opening.

The amazing part are the highly-magnified poppy seeds themselves. If you look at them closely (click the image on your computer to enlarge it, or use “haptic” motions on a phone or iPad to view the seeds more closely) you’ll see that these are not just the simple little black dots we associate with the poppy seed. At this intense magnification, they are patterned and almost honeycombed. There’s amazing detail and structure even in the smallest things in the natural world.

Crown of Papavers © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Recent Images

I’m pleased with my images from the last week or so, and am having trouble keeping up with my photography in post-production, and also as a blogger. But here are three of my recent images (below). There’s just so much going on the real world and with family…

On the Workshop front, the early-bird discount on Photography Flowers for Transparency ends soon. And, I’m off to Iceland for photography in two weeks!

Papaver Pods © Harold Davis

I never promised you a rose garden © Harold Davis

Gaillardia © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography, Workshops

Some flowers from our garden

The Way Things Were © Harold Davis

Papaver rhoeas © Harold Davis

Click here for our upcoming (September) Photographing Flowers for Transparency in-person workshop!

Posted in Flowers, Photography

The Blossfeldt Effect Webinar

What: The Blossfeldt Effect

When: Saturday June 12, 2021 at 11AM PT.

Where: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in each session. Seating is limited. The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Details: Karl Blossfeldt (1866-1932) began his career at a decorative ironwork manufacturer. He was assigned the task of creating reference botanical photographs to use for wrought iron designs. Eventually, his iconic botanical images became celebrated in their own right, and today he is known as one of history’s foremost botanical photographers.

Harold has long been fascinated by Blossfeldt’s botanical imagery and has developed a set of techniques for emulating the beautiful photographs of this master. Some of Harold’s work in homage to Blossfeldt has even been mistaken for the real thing! You can check out a portfolio of Harold’s prints after Blossfeldt on Saatchi Art

Click here to read more, and here to register for this webinar!

Papaver Pod from above © Harold Davis

Posted in Workshops

The Blossfeldt Effect

What: The Blossfeldt Effect

When: Saturday June 12, 2021 at 11AM PT.

Where: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in each session. Seating is limited. The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Details: Karl Blossfeldt (1866-1932) began his career at a decorative ironwork manufacturer. He was assigned the task of creating reference botanical photographs to use for wrought iron designs. Eventually, his iconic botanical images became celebrated in their own right, and today he is known as one of history’s foremost botanical photographers.

Harold has long been fascinated by Blossfeldt’s botanical imagery and has developed a set of techniques for emulating the beautiful photographs of this master. Some of Harold’s work in homage to Blossfeldt has even been mistaken for the real thing! You can check out a portfolio of Harold’s prints after Blossfeldt on Saatchi Art.

Papaver Pod from above © Harold Davis

In this unique and creative webinar, Harold will start with a look at the characteristics of a Blossfeldian composition. What kinds of subjects did Blossfeldt choose to photograph, and why? What makes a particular botanical specimen visually exciting?

Next, Harold will explore two possible places to start with Blossfeldian botanical compositions: the black background and the light box.

To cap it off, Harold will demonstrate how he processes his Blossfeldt-like images using some surprisingly simple yet tricky steps.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Who should attend: Everyone interested in the extraordinary work of Karl Blossfeldt; those interested in botanical art; anyone who would like to take the creative techniques that Harold will demonstrate into their own work.

Number of Seats and Tuition: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in this webinar.  Seating (on a first come, first served basis) is limited. You must register via Zoom to be enrolled in this webinar! The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Queen Anne's Lace © Harold Davis

Queen Anne’s Lace © Harold Davis

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is an artist, photographer, educator, and the  bestselling author of many books, including most recently Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Falling in Love

It’s hard not to fall in love with a poppy like this Papaver rhoeas ‘Falling in Love’ (a kind of “corn poppy” using the common term). Click here for more recent photos of poppies from our garden!

Falling in Love © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Pandemic Print Pricing Ending Shortly

Our special pandemic print pricing ends May 1, 2021. Please place orders for “Pandemic Prints” (at the special price) by Saturday, May 1, 2021! After Saturday, we will fulfill the outstanding pandemic print orders at the special price, but my print pricing will return to normal for new orders.

Thank you for your support during these turbulent times.

Papaver on Fire © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography, Print of the Month

Flowers or Sea Creatures on Earth Day

Today is Earth Day 2021, and I present some close-up photographs of flowers. These are images of the core of a poppy (Papaver hybridium), but looked at as abstract forms they could also be, perhaps, sea creatures.

Have you ever looked really close at a flower or plant? Go ahead! There are worlds within.

When beauty makes me cry © Harold Davis

Cupcake Core © Harold Davis

One if by land © Harold Davis

The sequence above is shown from farthest out, to closest in—with the flower core looking most like a marine creature or insect at the highest magnification.

Corn Poppy is a related image, shown here.

Posted in Flowers, Photography