Search Results for: Papaver

Papaver Rhoeas

It’s poppy time of year in my garden. I can’t resist a poppy, they are among my favorite flowers to photograph. Ephemeral and architected to respond to even slight wind (so motion is always an issue at the slower shutter speeds often used for macro work), poppies are not the easiest flowers to photograph. Stunning colors and a kind of naive lack of pretension (decorative poppies are no hothouse roses bred for commerce) makes the effort worth it.

Papaver Rhoeas

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With this Papaver rhoeas I intentionally underexposed to help me get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid the flower-in-motion problem. I shot at 1/800 of a second on a tripod with my 100mm macro lens fairly wide open at f/5.6 and ISO 200.

My idea was to get the center in focus, and to minimize the focus degradation across the rest of the flower by getting as parallel to the flower as possible.

Naturally, the histogram bunched to the left (I was underexposed by a couple of stops), but I was able to salvage this in the multi-RAW conversion process, with only a little extra noise.

Recent Papaver story: Salutation to the Sun; More poppies.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver Danebrog

This Papaver danebrog, or Poppy Danish Flag, is a species of Poppy Somniferum, or opium poppy, that I got from Annie’s Annuals.

The flower is pretty nice, and I photographed it with my shortest macro lens, a Sigma 50mm f/2.8 DG macro D.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver and Shadow

At first glance, one might think this image is a Photoshop composite of a black-and-white image and a color photo, but it is not a composite. It is a single photograph. This Papaver nudicaule (Icelandic Poppy) was gowing in a pot outside our front stairs. It rained the night before, and in the early morning. Then the sun came out. I took the photograph carefully, lens stopped down for depth of field, and exposing for the yellow flower because I knew I wanted the shadow area to go black. Then I processed the RAW file carefully a number of times for the flower, and with different color balance and exposure settings for the shadows. If you look carefully at the shadow areas, you can see that in fact they are not monochromatic, and tend toward the red side of things.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Papaver Birth

It’s tough to catch a poppy in the moment of birth: turn around and the poppy has breached its pod and is a newborn flower. Not only that, poppies are low to the ground on a stalk that is extremely sensitive to any breeze. Fortunately, this Papaver nudicaule cooperated. The only cost: a little laughter from my kids who thought I looked silly hugging the ground with the camera low on a tripod.

Posted in Bemusements, Flowers, Photography

Some flowers from our garden

The Way Things Were © Harold Davis

Papaver rhoeas © Harold Davis

Click here for our upcoming (September) Photographing Flowers for Transparency in-person workshop!

Posted in Flowers, Photography

The Blossfeldt Effect Webinar

What: The Blossfeldt Effect

When: Saturday June 12, 2021 at 11AM PT.

Where: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in each session. Seating is limited. The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Details: Karl Blossfeldt (1866-1932) began his career at a decorative ironwork manufacturer. He was assigned the task of creating reference botanical photographs to use for wrought iron designs. Eventually, his iconic botanical images became celebrated in their own right, and today he is known as one of history’s foremost botanical photographers.

Harold has long been fascinated by Blossfeldt’s botanical imagery and has developed a set of techniques for emulating the beautiful photographs of this master. Some of Harold’s work in homage to Blossfeldt has even been mistaken for the real thing! You can check out a portfolio of Harold’s prints after Blossfeldt on Saatchi Art

Click here to read more, and here to register for this webinar!

Papaver Pod from above © Harold Davis

Posted in Workshops

The Blossfeldt Effect

What: The Blossfeldt Effect

When: Saturday June 12, 2021 at 11AM PT.

Where: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in each session. Seating is limited. The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Details: Karl Blossfeldt (1866-1932) began his career at a decorative ironwork manufacturer. He was assigned the task of creating reference botanical photographs to use for wrought iron designs. Eventually, his iconic botanical images became celebrated in their own right, and today he is known as one of history’s foremost botanical photographers.

Harold has long been fascinated by Blossfeldt’s botanical imagery and has developed a set of techniques for emulating the beautiful photographs of this master. Some of Harold’s work in homage to Blossfeldt has even been mistaken for the real thing! You can check out a portfolio of Harold’s prints after Blossfeldt on Saatchi Art.

Papaver Pod from above © Harold Davis

In this unique and creative webinar, Harold will start with a look at the characteristics of a Blossfeldian composition. What kinds of subjects did Blossfeldt choose to photograph, and why? What makes a particular botanical specimen visually exciting?

Next, Harold will explore two possible places to start with Blossfeldian botanical compositions: the black background and the light box.

To cap it off, Harold will demonstrate how he processes his Blossfeldt-like images using some surprisingly simple yet tricky steps.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Who should attend: Everyone interested in the extraordinary work of Karl Blossfeldt; those interested in botanical art; anyone who would like to take the creative techniques that Harold will demonstrate into their own work.

Number of Seats and Tuition: Zoom authenticated registration and a tuition payment of $29.95 is required for enrollment in this webinar.  Seating (on a first come, first served basis) is limited. You must register via Zoom to be enrolled in this webinar! The registration link is https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WdzXDLdfQ0Gs1dnzjuj08Q

Queen Anne's Lace © Harold Davis

Queen Anne’s Lace © Harold Davis

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is an artist, photographer, educator, and the  bestselling author of many books, including most recently Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Falling in Love

It’s hard not to fall in love with a poppy like this Papaver rhoeas ‘Falling in Love’ (a kind of “corn poppy” using the common term). Click here for more recent photos of poppies from our garden!

Falling in Love © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Pandemic Print Pricing Ending Shortly

Our special pandemic print pricing ends May 1, 2021. Please place orders for “Pandemic Prints” (at the special price) by Saturday, May 1, 2021! After Saturday, we will fulfill the outstanding pandemic print orders at the special price, but my print pricing will return to normal for new orders.

Thank you for your support during these turbulent times.

Papaver on Fire © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography, Print of the Month

Flowers or Sea Creatures on Earth Day

Today is Earth Day 2021, and I present some close-up photographs of flowers. These are images of the core of a poppy (Papaver hybridium), but looked at as abstract forms they could also be, perhaps, sea creatures.

Have you ever looked really close at a flower or plant? Go ahead! There are worlds within.

When beauty makes me cry © Harold Davis

Cupcake Core © Harold Davis

One if by land © Harold Davis

The sequence above is shown from farthest out, to closest in—with the flower core looking most like a marine creature or insect at the highest magnification.

Corn Poppy is a related image, shown here.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Corn Poppy

Sometimes when I photograph a broad composition on my light box I take a break when my primary composition is done. I leave my camera on the tripod. Then after a copy of tea or a wander in the garden I come back and look at portions of the whole, and even examine individual flowers as they appear back lit on the light box. Maybe it is time to get closer! This image of a Corn Poppy, Papaver rhoeas, is one result that I think is pretty special.

Corn Poppy © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Photographing Flowers for Transparency Free Webinar

To celebrate Earth Day, Thursday April 22, 2021, Rocky Nook is sponsoring a special webinar with Harold Davis, Photographing Flowers for Transparency. This is a free webinar, to be given at 11am PT, but advance registration is required. Click here to register!

 In this detailed presentation, Harold Davis shows his stunning floral imagery and explains in detail his process for light box photography. Botanical composition, exposure, and post-production are explained.

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Harold says: “Light box photography is a joy in and of itself, and is a great form of photography to practice at home with relatively minimal investment in equipment. Techniques that can be learned from light box photography cut across myriad aspects of photography, and will enrich all aspects of your photographic practice.”

The presentation will include stop-motion video showing one of Harold’s light box compositions as it is created, and Harold will show the post-production steps with an actual example.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

This is a free webinar, but advance registration is required. Click here to register!

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a artist, photographer, educator, and the  bestselling author of many books, including most recently Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Posted in Workshops

Photographing Flowers for Transparency [Free]

What: Photographing Flowers for Transparency is a free webinar with Harold Davis sponsored by Rocky Nook. The webinar is free, but advance registration is required. Click here to register!

When: Earth Day, Thursday April 22, 2021, at 11am PT

Where: On your computer via Zoom anywhere. The advance registration link is https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bQ6N8UWaREysCftXWvc5QQ

Details: In this detailed presentation, Harold Davis shows his stunning floral imagery and explains in detail his process for light box photography. Botanical composition, exposure, and post-production are explained.

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Harold says: “Light box photography is a joy in and of itself, and is a great form of photography to practice at home with relatively minimal investment in equipment. Techniques that can be learned from light box photography cut across myriad aspects of photography, and will enrich all aspects of your photographic practice.”

The presentation will include stop-motion video showing one of Harold’s light box compositions as it is created, and Harold will show the post-production steps with an actual example.

There will be ample time for Q&A.

Registration: This is a free webinar, but advance registration is required. Click here to register!

About Harold Davis: Harold Davis is a artist, photographer, educator, and the  bestselling author of many books, including most recently Creative Garden Photography from Rocky Nook. He is the developer of a unique technique for photographing flowers for transparency, a Moab Master, and a Zeiss Ambassador. He is an internationally known photographer and a sought-after workshop leader. His website is www.digitalfieldguide.com.

Harold Davis—Best of 2020

Obviously, 2020 has been a difficult year for everyone. It was also not the year it started out being for me. Let me explain. In February and March I was first in Yosemite, teaching in a workshop. Next I was in Death Valley, followed by Escalante, Utah and the country around Moab.

I’d noted a news item about a novel disease in China, but didn’t think it would have very much applicability to my life and work. Oh, how oblivious we mortals can be!

My plans were to get home from the southwest, stay a few weeks, then head to Europe to lead a workshop in southwestern France followed by a stint walking as a pilgrim on the Camino de Santiago. And so on.

Obviously, my travel plans did not come to pass. We’ve spent the rest of 2020 at home, sheltering-in-place. One of these days I hope to travel again. But in the meanwhile, 2020 has seen my own, personal artist-in-residency-at-home. Which has made for works capturing on a smaller scale than many of my best-of photographs from years gone by, but I think I found plenty to capture at home. On the whole, it has been a productive year for me.

My “Best Of” selections for prior years, going back to 2013, can be found here.

Hydrangea Blossoms and Rock Spiral © Harold Davis

Hydrangea Blossoms and Rock Spiral © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Skim Ice on the Merced © Harold Davis

Skim Ice on the Merced © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Tulip Fandango © Harold Davis

Tulip Fandango © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Folds in the Earth © Harold Davis

Folds in the Earth © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Zabriskie View © Harold Davis

Zabriskie View © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Eye of the Tower © Harold Davis

Eye of the Tower © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Opening Train Bridge © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Power Lines © Harold Davis

Power Lines © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

White Papaver Nudicaule Inversion © Harold Davis

White Papaver Nudicaule Inversion © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Parfait Mandala 1 © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Patterns in Glass 3 © Harold Davis

Patterns in Glass 3 © Harold Davis

Egg White © Harold Davis

Egg White © Harold Davis

Nemesia and Gaillardia © Harold Davis

Duo © Harold Davis

Duo © Harold Davis

Florabundance © Harold Davis

Honeysuckle © Harold Davis

Honeysuckle © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Dried Blossoms © Harold Davis

Dried Blossoms © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Flowers from our Pandemic Garden © Harold Davis

Flowers from our Pandemic Garden © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Brookside-Snowball Dahlia © Harold Davis

Brookside-Snowball Dahlia © Harold Davis

Let the sunshine in © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Red Onion Slice © Harold Davis

Pear Slices © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

There's always one in every barrel! © Harold Davis

There’s always one in every barrel! © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Apple Slice Playdate © Harold Davis

Metamorphosis © Harold Davis

Metamorphosis © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Spiral of Flower Karma © Harold Davis

Spiral of Flower Karma © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Bottled Light Study © Harold Davis

White Dahlia Inversion © Harold Davis

White Dahlia Inversion © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Flowers are Multitudes © Harold Davis

Flowers are Multitudes © Harold Davis

Click here for the blog story!

Serendipity with Sunflowers Inversion © Harold Davis

Bike Rack © Harold Davis

I hope you’ve enjoyed my images and the associated blog stories. For convenience, I’ve included a link below the image where I’ve written about it in my blog.

Most images available as prints. Please inquire. As of today, we are still running our Pandemic Print special.

Check out my self-selected bests from previous years in Best Images Annuals!

Posted in Best Of

Photographing Flowers at Home

So I am sheltering in place at home, like many (or most) of us. In some alternative universe, my travel plans have proceeded, well, according to plan—and I would be in the midst of a long trip to Germany, France, and trekking along the Camino de Santiago. Since I seem unable to predict what groceries we will have tomorrow, or when there will be plentiful TP again, or indeed anything at all about the Zombie Apocalypse that is upon us, predicting when I will travel again with my camera seems a true exercise in futility.

For me, there is some good news in all the awful stuff going on. First, we remain very busy. Also, our four kids are actually happier on Zoom and at home than they were in school. In contrast to some parental angst I have been reading about being cooped up with one’s kids, they have been getting along very nicely together, and we all have been enjoying spending time together.

And the garden is going into full bloom! If I can’t photograph the world at large, I can have a great time photographing at home. Here are some of my floral images from recent days! No social distancing for these flowers. Which one is your favorite?

Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

Poppies from our Garden Path © Harold Davis

Flowers as a Group © Harold Davis

Flowers as a Group © Harold Davis

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Papaver Party © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography