Monthly Archives: January 2010

Seven Peaches

Seven Peaches

Seven Peaches, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

I like the comment on Flickr, where I originally posted this photo a few months back: “Yep…seven. I checked.”

Let’s hear it for literalism, an often overlooked and powerful way of thinking that goes against the prevailing tide of metaphoric mysticism that tends to inform art and photography!

I photographed the seven peaches on my garage floor using natural light with a white board to bounce some extra light into the peaches using my Sigma 50mm f/2.8 macro lens at 1/20 of a second and f/11, ISO 100, tripod mounted. For once, there’s very little post-processing here.

Posted in Bemusements, Photography, Still Life

Rift in the Clouds

Rift in the Clouds

Rift in the Clouds, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

New Year’s Eve featured a blue moon rising early, but the layers of fog and clouds that swept over San Francisco Bay made a capture seem unlikely.

When the moon made a brief appearance through a rift in the clouds I was ready, with an exposure biased towards the moonlight. The composition is based on the idea of letting everything besides the moon and its light on the water go pitch black. And also on the aesthetic pleasures of grain, er, I mean noise.

Exposure data: Nikon D300, 65mm, 1/30 of a second at f/5.0 and ISO 3200, hand held; yes, folks, you read that right, ISO 3,200. Look ma, no tripod.

Posted in Digital Night, Landscape, Monochrome, Photography

Won Ton

Won Ton

Won Ton, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This is a close-up of a won ton dumpling with particularly nice folds in the dough from the take-in Chinese meal that helped celebrate my recent birthday.

The point of the photo is that often the specifics of what you are photographing don’t matter that much. I bet you didn’t know this was a dumpling until I said so, anymore than you could know the subject of Plumbing without the title.

Also, this is a model that is good enough to eat, quite literally.

Posted in Bemusements, Monochrome, Photography

Pink Rose

Pink Rose

Pink Rose, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

I photographed this pink rose by morning sunlight, using a mirror and some white board to reflect the sunlight streaming in the window back up and into the rose.

This view is pretty close, because I was really taken with the inner spiral—almost appears to be two spirals curled together.

I have some other nice versions of this rose and one of its buddies, purchased in a Trader Joe’s bouquet. Proving once again that the you don’t need to be expensive or exclusive to be beautiful—at least if you are a flower.

Some of my recent rose images: Eye of the Rose; Kiss From a Rose; Variegated Rose; Curves; Structure of Rose.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Having It Both Ways

Yosemite

Yosemite, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

In my previous post I showed a photo taken a few years ago of Yosemite Valley—and noted that the work of a digital photography is never definitively done. It’s tempting, and often but not always an improvement, to rework the post-processing of older images; or to process images bypassed in the first edit.

You also don’t need to make an either-or choice between color and black & white. This image shown in this story was re-purposed into monochrome from the color photo in the last story. I created the dramatic black-and-white sky using a high contrast Red filter b&w adjustment layer in Photoshop, in case you are interested.

There’s some disagreement over on Flickr as to whether the black & white or color version is preferred (see the linked comments). I say, why not have both? A “two-fer”…

Posted in Landscape, Monochrome, Photography, Yosemite

Yosemite

Yosemite

Yosemite, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Love may mean never having to say sorry—but digital means you’re never definitively done. This is a re-work of a RAW file originally shot in 2007 of Yosemite Valley in late February following a dusting with snow.

Posted in Landscape, Photography, Yosemite

Stasis

Stasis

Stasis, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Water drops on a spider web on a bright day following rain make me very happy. The web keeps the drops in stasis—still enough for effective macro photography.

Exposure data: Nikon D300, 200mm f/4 macro lens, 24mm extension tube, Nikon 6T close-up filter, 1/2 second at f/32 and ISO 200, tripod mounted.

Related image: Interstitial.

Posted in Photography, Water Drops

Lonely Islet

Lonely Islet

Lonely Islet, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This lonely islet sits in San Francisco Bay off China Beach a few hundred feet from the shore. It’s bigger by far at low tide (shown here).

On a fogswept evening it is possible to imagine being marooned on this tiny spit of land, and feeling alone in a forlorn world. The lights of a distant freighter can be dimly seen in the distance. But all too likely the islet is hardly visible from the ship, which will pass by in the dusk.

Posted in Landscape, Monochrome, Photography

Plumbing

Porcelain Series No. 1

Porcelain Series No. 1, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

For my first post of the new year, I’ll note that things are often not what they seem. Some images are worth a second look. And furthermore, it’s one of the jobs of photography to prod, jolt or cajole the unsuspecting viewer into taking that second look.

This might be an image of female body parts, but in fact it is the plumbing on the underside of a toilet found at Urban Ore, a place that specializes is recycling. Shot with my 85mm macro at f/64 on a bright, overcast recent day.

Posted in Bemusements, Monochrome, Photography