Category Archives: Water Drops

Falling Flowers

Falling Flowers © Harold Davis

For a shot like this to work, everything has to fall into place. In a brief intermission between taking care of Katie Rose (she was napping) and getting a book proposal out the sun came out. Reconnoitering, I saw light glistening on a wet spider web (it had been raining earlier).

I got out my big, honking 200mm macro lens and mounted it on tripod via the lens collar. I added an extension tube between the lens and camera, and a +4 close-up filter at the end of the lens. Then I shot straight down on the web, with a Gaillardia (native American blanket flower) reflected and refracted in the water drops.

If you liked this image, you might also like Orbit; Interstitial; my Water Drops category on this blog; my Flickr Water Drops set.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography

Sunshine on a Rainy Day

Sunshine on a Rainy Day

Briefly noted: Out shooting waterdrops during a break in the rainy weather we’ve had recently. Liquid sunshine in a drop!

EXIF data: 200mm f/4 macro, 36mm extension tube, +4 close-up filter, 0.3 of a second at f/36 and ISO 200, tripod mounted.

Also posted in Photography

Twig

Twig

Along the banks of the Merced today while the children played I photographed water drops.

In this one, you can see the beginnings of spring. The water drop is on a new shoot, and a new blossom is reflected within it.

Also posted in Photography

Jade Forest

Jade Forest

Briefly noted: I am not escaping into the water worlds and forests of drops; rather, I am taking the boys to Yosemite for a few days. The girls stay behind and keep the home fires burning. Back soon.

Other drops, same plant: Serendipity Rules.

Also posted in Photography

Jade Drops

Jade Drops

Around the corner a huge Jade Plant, Crassula argentea, grows out over the street. This plant is an excellent waterdrop catcher, and I enjoy photographing it following the rain. This one looks to me like an alien life form, or else a waterdrop antenna dish!

Look closely enough, and you’ll find me in one of the drops.

Related image: Serendipity Rules.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography

Water Drop Season

Happy Wanderer Sunburst

With flowers beginning to bloom and spring on the horizon, water drop season is open. I went hunting the other day after a fairly long siege of cold and rainy weather. The first morning after the storm passed the water drops were gleaming in the sun like treasure.

Phyllis made me some coffee, and I hurried out to catch the drops before they evaporated—something that can happen very quickly.

There’s nothing I love to photograph more than a good water drop world!

Return of the Sun

Please note a correction to my earlier story about stacking modes. Whether or not you use the Statistics action, in Photoshop CS5 stack modes are only available in the Extended edition. If you have the standard edition these menu items will appear grayed out. I was misinformed, and I am sorry if you spent time trying to follow my original instructions with the standard edition.

Also posted in Photography

Star Magnolia

Star Magnolia

It has rained hard the last few days. On one of the breaks in the weather I wandered across the street. A Star Magnolia, Magnolia stellata, was attractively in bloom, pale in the diffuse light, bearing water drops as evidence of the wet weather. I used a telephoto macro lens to capture the delicate and elegant petals.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography

Drops of Rain

Drops of Rain

Drops of Rain, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Another water drop photo from the other morning…to get this one I combined shots with several different focus points. Depth-of-field is astoundingly shallow when you get really close, and sometimes you need more than one capture to get a fair degree of focus, even with the lens fully stopped down.

Each exposure with my 200mm macro and 36mm extension tube: 4/5 of a second and f/36 and ISO 100.

This technique is sometimes called “focus stacking,” or as I’ve dubbed it HFR—High Focus Range—photography. You can read my explanation of HFR by following this link.

Also posted in Photography

Serendipity Rules

Crassula argentea

Crassula argentea, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

It rained overnight, and after I dropped the boys off at the school bus stop the weather turned perfect for water drops: calm, still, with bright but diffuse lighting. I photographed this flower on a Jade Plant (Crassula argentea) along the street near our house—it almost looks like it was lit in a studio on black seamless with softboxes. No way. This is impromptu street lighting—sometimes I like to think of it as my water drop studio.

A neighbor saw me, and called out, “I had no idea you relied on serendipity. I thought you used an eye dropper to make your water drops.”

Serendipidty rules. That, and my 200mm macro telephoto lens.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography

Light Star

Light Star

Light Star, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This is a water drop shot from the rainy season last year (taken in early February). Now that it has started to rain again this year, I’m looking forward to shooting more water drops.

There’s something about the water drops created naturally and found on location that beats anything one can construct. I guess you could say I’m an all-natural earthy-crunchy kind of water drop guy!

Also posted in Photography

Orbit

Orbit

Orbit, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Head down and hard at work on a new book project, it was fun this morning to take a break. My break coincided with a break in the weather—so I got to photograph these beautiful water drops orbiting in the space around the flower that is their sun.

A couple of related stories with images of flowers reflected and refracting in inidividual water drops: Gaillardia Drop; Passion in a Drop.

Briefly noted: My book Creative Black & White: Digital Photography Tips & Techniques is number one in the black and white photography book category on Amazon. Thanks to everyone who helped make this possible.

Also posted in Bemusements, Flowers, Photography

Color Efex Reviewed

Good Morning Spider

Good Morning Spider, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This image of a spider and morning water drops graces my review of Nik Software’s Color Efex Pro filter set. The review is now live on Photo.net.

Also posted in Photography, Software Reviews

Gaillardia Drop

Gaillardia Drop

Gaillardia Drop, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

The day was moist with sudden rain squalls followed by brief, intermittent periods of sunshine. In one of the times without rain I went out into the strangely moist world of my garden.

Staring down at the spider web strategically located above a Gaillardia bud, I saw the blossom perfactly framed in water drop. I ran inside to get my tripod and macro lens. Kit in hand, I framed the photo, locked my mirror up, and snapped the shot.

Next thing, it was raining again and I retreated inside before the incoming Pacific squall.

Related story: Passion in a Drop.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography

Leaf’s Edge

Leaf's Edge

Leaf’s Edge, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

In the early morning light I slipped out with my camera, flip-flops on the wet grass. On this leaf, the rising sun hit the water drops on the knife’s edge—the drops themselves casting shadows, while the transparency of the leaf gleamed with capillarity.

Life is sometimes like the edge on this leaf. We don’t know which side holds the shadows, and which the sun’s refraction. The gap between front and back can be as thin as this leaf, as brief as a heart beat, or as ephermal as a change in emotion or perception.

Also posted in Patterns, Photography

Passion in a Drop

Passion in a Drop

Passion in a Drop, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Small rain drops caught in a spider web suspended over flower buds were among my subjects on an exciting day of intermittent sunshine, clouds and heavy rain.

The Passiflora (shown above) is seen in its entirety within tiny drops, while the outline of the whole colorful flower is shown out-of-focus as a backdrop. The Gazania (below) in only partially seen in the background—the bud is minature but entire within the water drop.

Gazania Reflections

View this image larger.

Also posted in Flowers, Photography