Photographer as Poet

When people learn that I am a professional photographer, it is not unusual for them to ask me next what kind of photographer I am. The answer is trickier than it might seem. According to Yahoo’s CEO Marissa Mayer, there is no such thing anymore as a professional photographer (because everyone has a DSLR). If you are primarily a wedding photographer you have a specialty (although it is less lucrative than it used to be). It’s possible to specialize in landscape and nature photography, but not too many photographers make a good living from it.

Peonies mon amour (with inken) © Harold Davis

Peonies (with inken) on washi © Harold Davis

But what about me?

I like to say that I am a “Photographer as Poet.” I photograph what I am interested in, and I figure out a way to market my work after I’ve made it. “What I am interested in” could mean just about anything or anyone. Photography is just the first step in my image making.

My images are more like poems than short stories—they have an internal cadence and structure.

I feel strongly enough about this “Photographer as Poet” thing that I’ve had a Japanese inken made for me (it’s a stamp, like a Chinese chop) that says “Photographer as Poet.” Here it is:

Harold Davis - Poet as Photographer

My inken is used as a decorative element and signature on some of the prints that I make.

Which brings me back to what I do. One of my collectors put it this way (and I think it rings true): I am an artist using techniques including digital painting, with digital photos my as my raw material (pun intended). The results usually don’t look like traditional photography. I like to use new technologies to refer to art of the past, and to mix-and-match genres. One example is the botanical image of peonies above, printed on a high-end inkjet printer on Awagami washi.

This could almost be traditional art, but it is not quite, of course. Nor is it so self-referential as to be coy. I want my poems to be enjoyable on their own, without any comprehension of the complex traditions that relate to their making, and without any need to notice the genres I’ve mixed and the conventions I’ve bent or broken in the process of creation and composition.

Related story: Rose after Delauney and O’Keeffe.

Posted in Flowers, Writing

Awagami Video with Botanique

I’m really pleased to note a new professionally-made video from Awagami about photographers who print on Awagami washi that shows my Botanique. The video can be played below, embedded from Facebook. The video is in Japanese with English translation in subtitles. Botanique is shown in the video at about the 50 second mark. 

Posted in Flowers, Japan, Photography

Rose after Delauney and O’Keeffe

At a recent lunch with my brother he reminded me how we both benefited from a classical education in the arts when we were young. I may not have got much of this stuff via formal education, but I sure was exposed to every layer of visual art history as a child thanks to my parents. Mostly, by seeing the stuff in person—from the paintings on the walls of the Caves of Lascaux to the museums with the “moderns” and everything in between.

To quote the dearly beloved and recently deceased Pete Seeger on the difference between education and experience, “Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don’t.”

I’m not sure how this fits with being dragged through every museum imaginable as a wayward kid—probably more in the experience category—but even as a bored child it was hard not to fall hard for the impressionists at first encounter.

Rose after Delauney and O'Keeffe © Harold Davis

Rose after Delauney and O’Keeffe © Harold Davis

Anyhow, this wasn’t what I had in mind when I went to work on the photo of the pale rose (far below), but I do know enough to recognize the palette and patterns of the great geometric painter Sonia Delauney along with the sensuousness of a Georgia O’Keeffe floral—when they pop out at me in an image I’ve created.

You’ll note that the original image is rotated 90 degrees. The other effects come from a series of LAB adjustments—inversions and equalizations—applied using a variety of blending modes.

Within each rose © Harold Davis

Within each rose © Harold Davis

For a couple of other examples of this kind of thing, check out Mandalas from a Glass Bowl, Broken Arrow and Creating LAB Patterns, and also see my article on Photo.net, Using LAB Color Adjustments.

Meanwhile, I must report that there is a certain goodwill towards the world that comes about from consorting with one’s fraternal sibling when both brothers are “of a certain age” with receding hairlines and cares and children of their own, and fondly reminiscing about some of the unique aspects of our culturally rich—and radically eclectic (or maybe eclectically radical)—upbringing.

Posted in Abstractions, Flowers, Photography, Photoshop Techniques

Where in the world is Harold Davis?

Anybody else remember Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? My kids sure don’t! Their world of computer gaming is deeply involved with Minecraft. Anyway, where in the world is Harold Davis? Right now, abroad at home, but for me this year is “back-end loaded” with travel, and I wanted to give you a heads-up.

First, the upcoming Black & White workshop I am giving in San Francisco the weekend of April 12-13 is my last scheduled workshop in San Francisco in 2014. This will be a small workshop oriented at field photography, and (as noted) I do have a few places left. Click here for more information and registration.

Cable Car Wheels © Harold Davis

Cable Car Wheels © Harold Davis

From mid-April through mid-May I will be in France, leading a photography workshop in Paris, and then exploring some rural parts of southern France on my own with my camera.

In June I’ll be presenting my prints at Photo Oakland in a free event, then leaving for Germany towards the end of the month. I’ll be giving two workshops at the Heidelberg Summer School of Photography. Although I expect most of the participants to be German photographers, I’ll be giving the workshops in English, and there are a few places still open. My workshops in Heidelberg are in flower photography and black & white. My sponsor, Zeiss Camera Lenses, will be loaning lenses for workshop participants to try!

Back in the States in mid-July, I’ll head pretty much straight away for Denver, where I’ll be making another online course with Craftsy. By the way, you can use this link for a $10 discount on my first Craftsy course, Photographing Flowers.

Chateau des Nazelles © Harold Davis

Chateau des Nazelles © Harold Davis

In August, I’ll be back in coastal California, with two weekend workshops in very cool locations: a Night Photography workshop in Big Sur August 1-3, and Creative Landscape Photography on Point Reyes August 8-10. There are some spaces available in each of these workshops.

I am planning to be back in Japan in October. One of the purposes of this trip is to scout locations for my Japan Photographic Odyssey, now tentatively scheduled for April 5-25, 2015. I will bring a very small group of photographers to explore some of the less-known areas of Japan. Stand by for details!

At the end of October I’ll be in New York for PhotoPlus Expo. I’ll head back to Europe in time to co-lead the Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco for most of November. By the way, if this interests you, we are taking waiting list applications (and it is not unusual to have one or two drop-outs due to personal reasons).

In December, I have the fifth annual winter Waves Photography workshop on Point Reyes scheduled for Saturday, December 13. Whether there are almost no waves (like last year) or massive surf in a storm (three years ago), this is always great fun! Please save the date, and check the Point Reyes Field Seminars website for registration availability.

Bixby Bridge by Starlight © Harold Davis

Bixby Bridge by Starlight © Harold Davis

They say travel broadens, and often this is true. You can learn much about what you have by seeing “the other.” I also find that travel also shows me what I care most about at home, and I am more able to be truly present when I am home knowing I will be soon adventuring again with my camera. I hope that you may be able to join me one of these days on one of my photographic adventures—and if you have a particular destination that you’d like to see me lead a workshop to, please don’t hesitate to let me know!

 

Into the votex of the universe © Harold Davis

Into the vortex of the universe © Harold Davis

Posted in Workshops

Flowers for the vernal equinox

To celebrate the spring equinox yesterday, here are some Tulips and Anemones shot on my light box for translucency (a white ranunculus peeks through on the upper left as well!). You can recognize some of these specimens in Kaleidoscope of Flowers. As you can see, I am enjoying our California spring!

Tulips and Anemones © Harold Davis

Tulips and Anemones © Harold Davis

Exposure data: Nikon D800, Zeiss 135mm f/2 APO Sonnar, 2 seconds at f/16 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Curated—A Different Version of Harold Davis

Danielle Wohl, an art consultant based in Palo Alto, California, has curated a different version of my work on her website. These are not the translucent florals on washi or high-tonal-range black & white prints I am used to collectors choosing. Danielle has selected imagery that verges on the abstract and depicts things like architectural details in Japan, a pattern on an old garden fence, and a stack of old dishes. Check out the Harold Davis page on the Danielle Wohl Art Advisory website.

Here are a couple of the images Danielle selected and the stories behind them:

Apartment Stairs in Shin-Imamiya © Harold Davis

Apartment Stairs in Shin-Imamiya © Harold Davis

With Apartment Stairs in Shin-Imamiya, I was traveling via a series of local trains in central Japan on my way between the monastery guesthouse in Mt Koyo and hiking the Kumano kodo. I changed trains at the Shin-Imamiya Station on the outskirts of Osaka, and there was a wait of an hour or so before my connecting train arrived. I decided to explore a little. You can’t tell from this shot of the patterned apartment stairs, but the area is surprisingly funky, with homeless people on the street right in front of the train station—not the neat and tidy Japan that tourists are supposed to see.

Plates © Harold Davis

Plates © Harold Davis

We had wrapped shooting my Craftsy Photographing Flowers course in Denver, and the crew and I were out for a celebratory lunch. I spotted this stack of plates in the restaurant, and shot and processed it on my iPhone on the spot! I suppose that I have “hungry eyes”—and that looking at interesting things is as necessary to me as food or drink.

Posted in Photography

The feeling is mutual: my Otus lens

I’ve posted a new informal review of my Zeiss Otus 1.4/55 on Photo.net. My conclusion: “If you can afford it, and if you can work with manual focus (which is often, in fact, my preference), then this lens will yield incomparable results when paired with a high resolution full frame sensor.” Click here to read the full review.

Otus & me---selfie via iPhone 5 camera app

Otus & me—selfie via iPhone 5 camera app

Here’s another recent image shot of a rose in black and white, made with my Otus:

Within each rose © Harold Davis

Within each rose © Harold Davis

Posted in Photography

Kaleidoscope of Flowers

Spring has come, and I know it’s true because I have anemones and ranunculae to add to my tulips on my light box for back lighting. Fun to create a composition that seems almost like a kaleidoscope image—but the colors are made of flowers!

Kaleidoscope of Flowers © Harold Davis

Kaleidoscope of Flowers © Harold Davis

Exposure information: Shot on a light box with a Nikon D800 and Zeiss Otus 55/1.4. Seven combined exposures, each exposure at f/11 and ISO 100, with exposure times between 1/60 of a second and 2 seconds. Camera tripod mounted; Harold ladder mounted. Exposures combined and processed in Adobe Camera RAW (ACR), Photoshop, Nik HDR Efex Pro, Nik Color Efex Pro, Topaz Adjust and Topaz Simplify.

Related image: Tulips in a Crowd.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Metamorphosis

The assignment I gave out on the second day of the Achieving Your Potential as a Digital Photographer workshop was to make a photo of something so that it looks like something else. In other words, change something to something new. In other words, metamorphosis.

Bathtub Landscape via IPhone © Harold Davis

Bathtub Landscape via IPhone © Harold Davis

My response to my own challenge: this abstract image I think of as a landscape with a highway and a canal, shot using my iPhone facing a bathtub at Urban Ore, and processed on the spot on the iPhone using the Plastic Bullet app.

I think the workshop was a great success. There will be ongoing follow-up sessions using webinar technology to make sure that action plans actually get implemented! I am very hopeful that metamorphosis will apply in the most positive way possible to the wonderful participants in this workshop, as well as to the imagery we made.

Posted in Abstractions, iPhone

Craneway Pavilion

“History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce,” wrote Karl Marx. In that spirit, the photo shows the floor and windows of what is now called the Craneway Pavilion. It’s used today for weddings, rock concerts, and trade show exhibits. Its most important historical use was to make military hardware during the second World War.

Ford Richmond Plant © Harold Davis

Ford Richmond Plant © Harold Davis

The Craneway Pavilion is located in Port Richmond, California, and is the largest space in the old Ford Richmond Plant—incorporated into the ponderously named Rosie the Riveter / WWII Home Front National Historical Park. Back in World War II, this space—designed by famed industrial architect Alfred Kahn—was where the military hardware that won the war in the Pacific was built, with more than 100,000 jeeps and tanks coming out of the Richmond Tank Depot (as it was known then).

Information about the image: Nikon D800, 28-300mm lens at 42mm, circular polarizer, eight exposures, each exposure at f/25 and ISO 100, shutter speeds ranging from 1/20 of a second to 20 seconds, tripod mounted; processed in Nik HDR Efex Pro, Adobe Camera RAW, Photoshop, Nik Color Efex Pro, Topaz Ajust and Topaz Simplify.

Posted in HDR, San Francisco Area

Beneath the Berkeley Pier

The Berkeley, California Pier juts out 3,000 feet into San Francisco Bay. When originally constructed in the 1920s, the pier was over three miles long, and an integral part of the Lincoln Highway, the first highway across the country. There was a ferry terminal at the end of the pier. While the western end of the pier has deteriorated and fallen in the water, much of the diminution in the length of the pier comes land fill. In other words, there is much less of San Francisco Bay than there used to be.

Beneath the Berkeley Pier © Harold Davis

Beneath the Berkeley Pier © Harold Davis

I have often shot the Berkeley Pier, with its wonderful views of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge, from the pier itself. For example, here’s one shot of the Berkeley Pier from  a few years back.

Recently, it occurred to me that it might be possible to shoot the pier from below. Yesterday afternoon, I checked the tide tables for the Berkeley Marina, and arrived at the Berkeley Pier at low tide.

Beneath the Berkeley Pier in Black and White © Harold Davis

Beneath the Berkeley Pier in Black and White © Harold Davis

Getting beneath the pier felt kind of weird, almost as if I were descending to the underworld through a crack. The opening was about two feet high, so I really had to slither with my gear and tripod to fit through (alas, I am not as svelte as I used to be!).

Once under the pier, however, I was surprised at the spaciousness. Of course, this was low tide, but the pier construction extended back over something like a chamber carved out of landfill.

Everything was clammy and wet. I shared the space with scuttling crabs, seaweed, rats and assorted broken glass and garbage. As I made my time exposures, every once in a while a wave came through the pilings with a splash that got my attention—and had me ready to move quickly to protect my gear if necessary. I found a place to position the tripod legs between the rocks, and moving them made a squishy sound in the mud. Mentally, I vowed to wash everything washable as soon as I got home!

Exposure data: Shot with my Nikon D800 using a Zeiss APO Sonnar 135mm f/2 lens at 4 seconds, f/22 and ISO 50; circular polarizer; tripod mounted.

Posted in Photography, San Francisco Area

Photograph San Francisco in Black and White—also Workshop Updates

Photograph San Francisco in Black and White

Please consider joining me the weekend of Saturday April 12 and Sunday April 13, 2014 for a black & white photographic tour of San Francisco. I like to think of this as the film noir workshop of San Francisco, although of course we will be working in digital. Click here for details, curriculum and registration.

Sunset on the Bay

Sunset on the Bay © Harold Davis

Depending on light, weather and group inclinations, we will shoot famous locations and those known only to locals, possibly including (but not limited to) the Golden Gate Bridge, Marin Headlands, Fort Point, the Cable Car Museum, Urban Ore and Market Street at Night. We will photograph in the daytime, and include at least one night shoot (Saturday night). Classroom sessions will cover black and white conversion, monochromatic HDR, and creating high tonal-range imagery.

The workshop will be based in Berkeley, California (we will carpool to locations) and the tuition is $695 per person. Click here for details, curriculum and registration.

Cable Car Wheels © Harold Davis

Cable Car Wheels © Harold Davis

City as Landscape © Harold Davis

City as Landscape © Harold Davis

Updates

My understanding based on email responses is that the Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco is almost full. However, we are taking firm registrations when we get completed applications and deposit checks—so if you are on the fence, send yours in now because there may still be a possibility of getting that last spot, and also we will be taking a waiting list.

Nearer to home, I am giving two extraordinary workshops on the coast of California you may wish to consider in August, 2014. I am very excited about both these workshops. Night Photography in the Big Sur Landscape is hosted by the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, CA the weekend of August 1-3 and Creative Landscape Photography on Point Reyes will take place at the historic and romantic Coastguard Boathouse the weekend of August 8-10 under the auspices of Point Reyes Field Seminars.

Perhaps needless to say, we do expect these workshops to be popular. To avoid disappointment, I urge you to register early.

Bixby Bridge by Starlight © Harold Davis

Bixby Bridge by Starlight © Harold Davis

Here are the related Meetup groups for these workshops:

If you are interested in flower photography, please keep in mind the Best of Botanicals National Juried Photography Exhibition partially benefiting the San Francisco Botanical Garden. Related to this exhibition, I will be presenting and discussing my botanical prints on Saturday, June 7 (this event is free). Finally, I am pleased to offer my Photographing Flowers online course at $10 off the $59.99 price (use this link for the special discount).

Tulip Pano © Harold Davis

Tulip Pano © Harold Davis

Posted in Monochrome, Workshops Tagged , , , , , , |

Mandalas from a Crystal Bowl

Wandering the crowded aisles of Berkeley’s Urban Ore—a somewhat dodgy cross between an upscale junkyard and a down-at-the-heels flea market with an added smidgen of green ideology—with my camera and Otus, I came across a beautiful cut crystal bowl in a locked cabinet. It was love at first sight. Finding the person with the key to unlock the cabinet and negotiating the price took a bit of time, but soon enough Otus and I were making our way home to photograph our new treasure.

Crystal Mandala 1 © Harold Davis

Crystal Mandala 1 © Harold Davis

I photographed my crystal bowl straight down using a light box and a bracketed high-key sequence of exposures. This is the technique I developed to capture flowers for transparency (actually, for translucency), and as I note in my presentation on the subject the technique produces interesting results with many subjects in addition to flowers. In this case, the high key HDR approach emphasized the contrast between the edge lines of the bowl and the negative spaces created by the transparent glass.

Crystal Mandala 2 © Harold Davis

Crystal Mandala 2 © Harold Davis

My next step playing in Photoshop was to invert the essentially monochromatic image, transforming black lines on a white background to black lines on a white background. It’s hard to get me going on this kind of thing without wanting to play in Photoshop, so I started using LAB adjustmentsHow do you make a mandala from a crystal bowl?

Red Crystal Mandala © Harold Davis

Red Crystal Mandala © Harold Davis

In this case, in addition to LAB inversions and equalizations, I used Nik Color Efex filters, direct painting on layers, layers, layer masks, and repeated application of some of the oddball blending modes such as Difference. Play around long enough in Photoshop and you never know what you will find!

Holographic Mandala © Harold Davis

Holographic Mandala © Harold Davis

With this imagery it was visually important to me to “square the circle” with a square crop. With some of the Crystal Mandalas, like the Holographic Mandala, there is almost a three dimensional look—part of the image jumps off the plane. In contrast, with Mandala Inside, the effects create an outer translucent shell or layer, with an inner core that is much bolder and more defined.

Mandala Inside © Harold Davis

Mandala Inside © Harold Davis

These could be small virtual worlds, and have become something completely unrelated to the original sequence of photos. When I first looked in my crystal bowl, I did not know where it would take me!

Green Lantern Mandala © Harold Davis

Green Lantern Mandala © Harold Davis

 

Lantern Mandala © Harold Davis

Lantern Mandala © Harold Davis

Posted in Abstractions, Photoshop Techniques

Best Of Botanicals: National Juried Photography Exhibition

Best Of Botanicals: National Juried Photography Exhibition

A Benefit for San Francisco Botanical Garden

Call for entries. Entries are due: April 3, 2014

From classical to contemporary, from desert to rain forest, from bud to decay, the natural form of flowers and plants has been contemplated by artists, philosophers, scientists . . . and everyone.

  • This is PHOTO’s second benefit for the San Francisco Botanical Garden. A percentage of sales will go to support the work of the San Francisco Botanical Garden in Golden Gate Park.
  • PHOTO is part of Oakland Art Murmur located in Oakland’s Uptown Arts District. The exhibit will be seen by thousands of visitors during the June and July First Friday art walks, and during regular hours for the duration of the show.
  • Best of Show Award: $1000
  • Harold Davis will speak on “Making the Botanical Photo: The Digital Print As an Artifact” on June 7. He is the recipient of many photo awards, a Moab Printmaking Master, and the author of numerous bestselling photography books, including “Photographing Flowers: Exploring Macro Worlds.” Click here for more information about this presentation.
  • Exhibit dates: May 22 – July 12

Click here for the complete Call for Entries, click here for exhibition info, here to enter work for the juried exhibition, and click here to view the PDF card for this event!

Three Flowers for Phyllis © Harold Davis

Three Flowers for Phyllis © Harold Davis

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco

I am very, very excited to announce that registration is now open for the Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco in November, 2014. In a nutshell, we will start photographing in Barcelona, drive down the Costa del Sol, and spend some time photographing the fabulous Alhambra in Granada, Spain. Next, we’ll ferry past the Rock of Gibralter to North Africa, where we’ll explore Tangier, Rabat and linger in Marrakech. For me, I am totally thrilled about what comes next: crossing the Atlas Mountains to spend some time exploring, luxury camping, and photographing the Sahara itself. We’ll make our way back via the imperial Morrocan cities of Fez and Meknes to Casablanca. From Casablanca, the group will fly to Lisbon (the cost of this flight is included), where we will spend a day exploring.

This will be us!

It’s my great pleasure to co-lead this destination photography workshop with distinguished commercial and stock shooter Bill Bachmann. Although we agree about many things, Bill has a different approach to photography than mine, and different areas of expertise—this means you will have the opportunity to learn two different skill sets from both of us.

The Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco is 18 days and 17 nights. Accomodations are at 4-star hotels (except the luxury camping in the desert part). Many meals are included. At $5,695 per person double occupany (the single supplement is $695), I think this is a GREAT deal. Bill in particular has worked very hard to get the best prices possible, and we both have tried to plan things so the trip will include those destinations that will be very unique and special with photographers in mind. Please note that trans-Atlantic airfare to Europe is not included in this cost, although we are working to arrange a lowcost airfare for those who want to travel with the group from Newark to Barcelona, and back from Lisbon to Newark (you are of course free to make your own arrangements and meet the group in Barcelona).

If this destination photography workshop interests you, I suggest you RUN not WALK to get your deposit and paperwork in. My guess is that between Bill’s followers and mine we will fill up pretty quickly (applications will be taken on a first come, first served basis). What you have to do is fill out the application form, and send it, along with a check for $500, to Bill. It’s pretty straightforward. The link is below. We won’t deposit the checks unless there is sufficient enrollment to run the Photographic Caravan. By all means, also drop me an email if you decide to enroll so I know you will be coming.

Click here to learn all about the Photographic Caravan to Spain and Morocco in terms of destinations, plans, details and what is included in the price. I think you’ll be amazed at this fabulous itinerary

If you are interested in enrolling, please click here for the registration form and mailing instructions.

Do feel free to email me if you have any questions. As I’ve said, I am incredibly excited about this, and look forward to having you join me on a photographic adventure of a lifetime.

Posted in Workshops