Search Results for: anemone

Red Anemone

Yesterday we decided it was time to do some spring planting so I would have flowers to photograph and so our garden would look pretty. We came home with a few bulbs, some poppy plants, and a red anemone. Of course, the first thing I wanted to do was to photograph a red anemone flower blooming on our small plant on my light box!

Red Anemone © Harold Davis

Anemones are named after the mythological Greek spirits of the wind, because of how nicely they bob around in a breeze.

If you love anemones as much as I do you might like to check out some of my other anemone photos. Here are some other anemone images of mine: An Amazing Amalgamation of Anemones; Anemone Fun; Anemones; Core of the Anemone; Anemone on Black; White Anemone; Anemone Japonica.

These images of course go back a number of years. You can see these and more via a keyword search for “anemone” on my blog!

Posted in Flowers, Photography

An Amazing Amalgamation of Anemones

Over the past few days I’ve had some amazing tulips as well as an amalgamation of anemones to play with. I have to admit to some inspirational thoughts looking through Georgia O’Keeffe paintings as research, although the reference isn’t clear in this image, the first I’ve processed from the many I’ve made. More work will follow as I have the time to process it.

Amazing Anemones © Harold Davis

Amazing Anemones © Harold Davis

To make Amazing Anemones, I used a Nikon D810, my Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4, Adobe Camera RAW, Photoshop processing using LAB color, and shot on a light box using a tripod. As opposed to many of my light box images, with this one I limited the light on the front of the flowers, so that essentially all illumination was coming from behind—through the flowers. Back lighting emphasizes the translucency of the petals, and the transparent colors that are reminiscent of stained-glass.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Wabi-Sabi Anemones

Beauty should never be a hostage to perfection. Wabi-sabi is a Japanese aesthetic that recognizes the beauty in transience and imperfection. These anemones were beautiful in their prime. They are also beautiful, in a different and perhaps deeper way, as they age.

Wabi-Sabi Anemones © Harold Davis

Wabi-Sabi Anemones © Harold Davis

Photographed on a white seamless background using sunlight with my Nikon D810 and Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 at 1.6 seconds, f/16, and ISO 64.

Related story: Tulip Wabi-Sabi.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Bouquet of Anemones

These pretty anemones come from Thomas Farms, and are organic (as well as locally sourced). The potential advantages of eating organic food are pretty clear, but why buy organic cut flowers? According to Thomas Farms, “Most cut flowers available in the U.S. are grown, assembled and packaged in third-world countries, where pesticide regulations are lax. Because flowers are such a high-value crop, they are doused with insecticides, fungicides and growth regulators, including chemicals that have been banned or restricted in the U.S. due to health or environmental concerns.” You can read more on the Thomas Farms website.

Bouquet of Anemones © Harold Davis

Bouquet of Anemones © Harold Davis

This bouquet of anemones was photographed with tender love on my light box for transparency using my Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 lens using a Nikon D810. Click here to see close-ups of a couple of these anemones.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone Fun

I am always amazed when I start a flower photography session: no two flowers are ever the same, and there are always an infinitude of possible ways to imagine a flower photo. Once you take up flower photography there is little chance that you will ever be bored.

Anemone 1 © Harold Davis

Anemone 1 © Harold Davis

These anemones interested me because they both showed red marking on a fairly white background. I photographed each with my Zeiss Otus 85mm lens, using three bracketed exposures. The darkest exposure was for the outer petals, and the lightest exposure was for the dark—almost black—core of each anemone.

Anemone 2 © Harold Davis

Anemone 2 © Harold Davis

The layer masks I created to combine the exposures bear some resemblance to bullseye targets. Either that, or to Kenneth Noland paintings without the color.

Want to see more of my anemone images? Check out Anemones ReduxNature’s Palette, Tulips and Anemones, and Anemones.

Click here for the Flower Photography category on my blog.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemones Redux and more floral panos on the way

Briefly noted: Here’s another shot of anemones to go with my earlier anemones composition. I’m working on the post-production of two new anemone panoramas. Of course, this kind of post-production work takes time—particularly when it must be fit in the context of everything else that I do.

Anemones 2 by Harold Davis

Anemones 2 © Harold Davis

I hope the new floral panos come out as well as the Star Magnolia panorama and Peonies panorama in Botanique!

Posted in Photography

Anemones

The North Berkeley farmer’s market, on a stretch of streets sometimes known as the “gourmet ghetto,” is certified organic throughout. Cruising with my camera, I spotted a flower vendor, Thomas Farm, with some wonderful tulips on display. Closer inspection also revealed some anemones, which mostly hadn’t opened yet. The anemones were one bunch for $5 and five bunches for $20. I “haggled” and got six bunches for my $20—a good deal indeed for my inner photographer since once these flowers started to open they displayed gorgeous translucent colors!

Anemones 1 by Harold Davis

Anemones 1 © Harold Davis

Anemones are named for the wind, using the Greek word for wind, anemos. They are supposed to open best when it is windy. Placing them in a sunny room, I found that they are also highly heliotropic—they open with sunshine and close up again at dusk.

So in the middle of the day, using sunshine for front light, I photographed them on my lightbox. For the image shown above I used eight exposures, with each exposure at f/32 and ISO 200. Shutter speeds were between 1/15 of a second and 10 seconds. (If my photographic and post-production techniques for shooting flowers for translucency interest you, you might want to consider the Photography Flowers for Transparency workshop I am giving at the end of 2013.)

I used my 85mm tilt-shift macro lens to make this shot, a lens I once described as “channeling” Edward Weston because it is completely manual and the kind of lens Weston used—you even have to stop it down yourself when you are ready to shoot because there is no auto diaphragm.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone and Water Drops

Anemone and Water Drops © Harold Davis

Anemone and Water Drops © Harold Davis

How fine it is to take advantage of a light rain, and photograph waterdrops caught in a spider web!

A small, delicate flower, an anemone, is behind the web and refracted and reflected in the waterdrops.

Here’s the Waterdrops category on my blog and my set of Waterdrop images on Flickr.

Posted in Flowers, Photography, Water Drops

Simple Anemone

Simple Anemone

Simple Anemone, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

Briefly noted: this flower is a simple and small anemone from our garden, photographed using a daylight-balanced white box.

More anemone images: Anemone Japonica, White Anemone.

[Nikon D300, Zeiss Macro 100mm f/2 ZF Makro-Planar T* Manual Focus Lens, three exposures combined in Photoshop from 0.5 of a second to 2.5 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.]

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone and Bicycles

Anemone

Anemone, photo by Harold Davis. View this image larger.

This is a close-up of an anemone, a flower in the buttercup (Ranunculus) family named after the Greek word for wind.

Technically, there’s a good comparison to be made with my extreme wide angle Lupine along the Trail, because both photos are composites of two exposures. So I was going with a story title like “an anemone is to a wide angle as a fish is to a bicycle” until I realized the whole title was too complicated, wouldn’t fit in the space I have for titles, and conveyed the wrong thought. So please consider “Anemones and Bicycles” a compaction of all that, even though there are no bicycles evident.

I exposed the anemone at 1.3 seconds for the background of the flower, and then layered on top a 4 second exposure of the flower core.

[Nikon D300, 200mm f/4 macro lens (300mm in 35mm terms), two exposures (one at 1.3 seconds, one at 4 seconds), both f/36 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.]

Other anemone images: Anemone, Core of the Anemone, Anemone Japonica.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone on Black

Here’s a photogram made from an anemone Japonica from our garden that I’m just getting around to blogging.

Posted in Flowers, Photograms, Photography

Core of the Anemone

When I posted yesterday’s photo of a pink anemone, I realized I had never blogged this white anemone core from a year ago, and I really like it (so here it is).

Related image: Jet Engine.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

Anemone

Anemones are members of the ranunculus family, and related to the buttercup. Taking a break from my task of working on my new book, Digital Light and Exposure, I couldn’t resist cutting some flowers from the garden, including dahlias and this anemone. With the cut flowers in water, I just had to photograph them. I used natural light in my studio, and classic high depth-of-field macro technique.

Related images: White Anemone, Anemone Japonica.

[85mm macro lens (127.5mm in 35mm terms, 36mm extension tube, 20 seconds at f/64 and ISO 100, tripod mounted.]

Anemones are said to be symbolic of memory, although I think this one looks more like an angel with wings and a burning core than a memory bank. In any case, the flower is apt for the day, 9/11. Few of us will forget the anniversary of an event that transfigured our world, and changed it for the worse. Here’s one of my photos, scanned from a slide, of the New York skyline before the Trade Towers came down.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

White Anemone

I realize I never blogged this white anemone from about eight months ago. So here it is. White. Simple.

Posted in Flowers, Photograms, Photography

Anemone Japonica

This is the first of a series of photos of Japanese Anemomes created using a variant of my digital photogram technique.

Posted in Flowers, Photograms, Photography