Category Archives: Flowers

We Happy Flower Few

A great Photographing Flowers for Transparency workshop was held this past weekend, with we happy flower few photographing roses, irises, lilies, tulips and more on several large light boxes. One memorable moment: the facility caretaker managed to burn something in the microwave setting off the fire alarm. He couldn’t turn off the alarm, and before we knew it fire fighters in full regalia were marching past the light boxes and flowers. Fortunately, the workshop participants took it all in stride!

I regard the image of a leaf below as a kind of “doodle.” It was part of an in-class demo of using backgrounds and working creatively with LAB color .

Lab Leaf 2 © Harold Davis

Lab Leaf 2 © Harold Davis

We also did more conventional light box work, for example this entire vase full of tulips on a white background. Everyone took their turn shooting the tulips and other flowers, and a great time was had!

Tulips on White © Harold Davis

Tulips on White © Harold Davis

Painterly Peony Panos

I shot this image of peonies on a light box in two panels, which were later stitched together in post-production to make a peony panorama. Each panel was photographed with a Nikon D800 and the Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 on a tripod. There were eight exposures in each panel, with the aperture at f/11 and ISO set to 100. Shutter speeds on each ranged from 1/40 of a second to 2.5 seconds. With the two panels stitched together, then cropped for composition, the resulting file is  quite large, 10,321 pixels by 4,712 pixels at 300ppi. This means I can make a 34″ wide print with no enlargement of the file, and it would be easy with no sweat to enlarge this two or three times with no noticeable loss of quality.

Peony Pano on White © Harold Davis

Peony Pano on White © Harold Davis

Want to learn more about the techniques I used to create this image? Check out my FAQ Photographing Flowers for Transparency and other FAQs on my site.

Painterly Peony Pano © Harold Davis

Painterly Peony Pano © Harold Davis

Other resources: I also have an upcoming workshop on Photographing Flowers for Transparency, and webinar recordings are available on Painting in Transparency Using a High-Key Layer Stack and Using Backgrounds and Textures.

Sunflower Sunrise

I love sunflowers! They are truly a wonderful flower. Of course, sunflowers are often depicted in art. For example, it is probably hard for me to say “sunflower” without thinking of Vincent van Gogh’s famous sunflower paintings. My version is Go van Gogh!

Sunflower Sunrise © Harold Davis

Sunflower Sunrise © Harold Davis

But did you know that the sunflower is also visually interesting from behind? Shot this way, from the back on a light box, with my D810 and a Zeiss 100mm f/2 macro lens, the sunflower reminds me of a landscape, or perhaps the sunrise itself!

Sunflower Sunrise (black & white) © Harold Davis

Sunflower Sunrise (black & white) © Harold Davis

Windswept Florals

I photographed this floral arrangement on a light box with my Nikon D810 and the Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4. My idea was to try to create a composition where it looked like the flowers were in motion, as they might be if they were wind-driven. After combining the high-key layer stack, I added a background and a textured overlay to create the final effect.

Windswept Florals © Harold Davis

Windswept Florals © Harold Davis

Interested in my techniques for creating this image? Please check out my webinars, and please consider the weekend Photographing Flowers for Transparency workshop, October 4-5, 2014.

Related FAQ: Photographing Flowers for Transparency.

Flowers for Nicky

My twelve year old son Nicky (shown here a while back) was in the ensemble at Berkeley Playhouse for a teen production of the musical Shrek. For opening night, his Grandma sent him flowers.

Flowers for Nicky © Harold Davis

Flowers for Nicky © Harold Davis

He (and we) enjoyed the bouquet for a while. Then, a couple of days after the performance, I spread them out on my light box, and photographed the flowers for transparency.

For more information on my technique, check out my FAQ: Photographing Flowers for Transparency.

Trio of Tulips at Giverny

On a misty spring afternoon we left Paris, getting on the van for Monet’s famous gardens at Giverny. The pre-visualizations that I saw in my mind’s eye along the drive were of images like Monet’s impressionistic paintings, or that showed the bridges in the Giverny water gardens. But when we got to the garden the simplicity of individual tulips in the light rain was too much for me to resist!

Red Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

Red Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

The afternoon was cloudy, but extremely bright. I shot each of these three images handheld, wide-open (at f/2), with my ISO set to 100, taking advantage of the brightness and wonderful bokeh of the superb  Zeiss 135mm f/2 lens. Shutter speeds were 1/1600 of second for Red Tulip (above), 1/5000 of a second for Variegated Tulip (below) and 1/8000 of a second for White Tulip (bottom). There was almost no post-production work other than RAW conversion.

Variegated Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

Variegated Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

So ultimately this is one of the simplest photography scenarios imaginable. If there is no post-production, then Photoshop was irrelevant (not of course that there is anything wrong with Photoshop). The superb brightness of the lens along with its telephoto focal length isolated the portion of the flower that is in focus from the background. The brightness of the lens allowed me to shoot at fast shutter speeds, eliminating the possibility of camera shake. The technical requirement was to “see” the image, and to focus accurately—with nothing else intermediating between me and the flowers.

White Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

White Tulip, Giverny © Harold Davis

Sometimes in this complex world of ours it is hard to remember that simple may be best! When we over-complicate things we can lose track of what is important, and what is not—and also the joy in simple things, of family and friends, clouds and wind, and flowers in a garden.

Scanning a Purple Flower

I was reminded of the very high resolution you can get from an inexpensive flatbed scanner recently when there was interest in a large print from one of my scanned flower images. With both the images shown here, the basic image was created on the scanner but I also photographed the flower, and blended the files from the camera and scanner.

Purple Flower Scan © Harold Davis

Purple Flower Scan © Harold Davis

Generally, flatbed scans can give you a very high resolution, but depth-of-field is very shallow. There’s no way to adjust depth-of-field, as you do by stopping down a lens. The ability to capture depth is also limited. If you try this technique, expect to spend a great deal of time spotting out dust, which almost always accompanies scanner images, particularly if you use a black (or dark) background. Combining a scan with a photo in some ways gives me the best of both worlds!

Purple Flower Dance © Harold Davis

Purple Flower Dance © Harold Davis

Very fun Flower Photography Workshop in Heidelberg

A very fun four-day creative flower photography workshop was had at the Heidelberg Summer School of Photography. This was a great group of compatible people and talented photographers genuinely excited by the subject matter. English was spoken (because of me) and also German (my feeble attempts at German were lovingly corrected). Italian was also spoken—not to mention the universal language of “photography.” The agenda included field trips to a lovely horticultural nursery and to the greenhouses at the Heidelberg University Botanical Gardens. We also practiced studio flower photography, and followed the full workflow of my method for capturing and processing flowers for transparency on a light box.

Pilea ovalis and Ancona muricata © Harold Davis

Pilea ovalis and Ancona muricata © Harold Davis

The image above is a study from the Heidelberg Botanical Gardens field trip. Since it is in monochromatic, it is a fitting segway to the next workshop, Creative Black & White Photography that starts in a few days. I hope it is as much fun and fosters gemütlichkeit as much as the Flower Photography did. You can see some of this gemütlichkeit, umlauts and all, in the row of wine glasses I shot at our farewell dinner, shown below.

Wine Glasses at a Dinner Party © Harold Davis

Wine Glasses at a Dinner Party © Harold Davis

White Poppy

White Poppy © Harold Davis

White Poppy © Harold Davis

Exposure data: Nikon D800, Zeiss 135mm f/2 lens with 12mm extension tube, 2 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted, exposed on a light box for transparency, processed in Adobe Camera RAW, Photoshop, and with Photoshop plug-ins from Nik and Topaz.

Peony Softness

I shot Peony Softness on a light box, showing the versatility of back lighting when it comes to flower photography. This is a very different look than most of my light box photography, but also very attractive.

Peony Softness © Harold Davis

Peony Softness © Harold Davis

What flowers are these?

“What flowers are these?” a reader asks. Peonies, poppies, a few roses and some campanulas (Canterbury Bells): The bounty of the garden.

Bounty of the Garden © Harold Davis

Bounty of the Garden © Harold Davis

Peonies are in bloom

It’s the peonies time of year, and I am putting aside some time to photograph some luscious Peony blossoms!

To learn how I made this photo, check out the FAQs Photographing Flowers for Transparency and Using a High-Key Layer Stack, and also my webinar recording Painting in Transparency Using a High-Key Layer Stack.

Bounty of the Garden - Center Panel © Harold Davis

Bounty of the Garden – Center Panel © Harold Davis

Exposure data: Nikon D800, Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4, six exposures each at f/11 and ISO 100, tripod mounted, exposures processed using Adobe Camera RAW, Adobe Photoshop, and Nik HDR Efex Pro.

I applied the peonies photo to a background of scanned paper created using a gradient, so it is slightly lighter at the top than the bottom. For more information about this technique, check out my webinar recording Using Backgrounds and Textures.

Related story: Peonies and Poppies.

Peonies and Poppies

Yesterday in the morning I wrote and posted my Using a High-Key Layer Stack FAQ. Around lunch time I took a product development conference call. Phyllis brought in some pizza for lunch. After lunch, I drove over to nearby Kensington, California with my pruning shears and clipped a bunch of Matilija Poppies from a strip right near the old downtown. These shrubby poppies are the only genus in the Papaver family besides those in the Eschscholzia  family that are native to California.

Poppies and Peonies © Harold Davis

Poppies and Peonies © Harold Davis

Back at home I pruned some Papaver rhoeas from the garden, and added some peonies to create a light box composition. Processing the resulting high-key layer stack took me well past a sane bedtime. A very full day, with some time for the kids.

Above, the image is shown on white, and below it is placed on a scanned paper background and lightly texturized.

Poppies and Peonies © Harold Davis

Poppies and Peonies © Harold Davis

Exposure data: I do not believe the resolution I achieved in this photo would have been possible without the clarity of my Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 lens. Nikon D800, 55mm, six exposures at ISO 100 and f/13, exposures ranging from 1/30 of a second to 1 second, tripod mounted, processing in Adobe Camera RAW, Nik HDR Efex Pro and Adobe Photoshop.

Giverny

I’ve been lucky enough to visit Monet’s gardens at Giverny three times in the past year, and each time they’ve been very different. The spring this year was good for tulips, and in the water garden area the wisteria were glorious.

Giverny © Harold Davis

Giverny © Harold Davis

There is a problem working in Monet’s gardens. These gardens are themselves are a work of art. Of course, they have been the most important subject of a great and world famous artist (Claude Monet himself). It’s hard not to look at Monet’s gardens, or to imagery depicting the gardens, without thinking of Monet’s great waterlily paintings.

Giverny Watercolor © Harold Davis

Giverny Watercolor © Harold Davis

In the shadow of the legendary, my best advice is to have fun—and not worry about the context or comparison too much. That’s what I did this year in Giverny. I had a blast, and look forward to processing more of my images from this very special place.

Related stories: Giverny via iPhone, White Chrysanthemums at Giverny, Dreaming of Giverny, Meditation at Giverny.

Papaver Somniferum and friends

Returning home from travels abroad in mid-May, one great pleasure was to find poppies still in bloom in my garden. The large one as big as a platter towards the top of the composition is a Papaver somniferum, the notorious opium poppy. Other species shown are Papaver rhoeas (corn poppies), garlanded with campanula. You can also see poppies in the process of popping (on the right, coming out of its pod).

Papaver Somniferum and Friends © Harold Davis

Papaver Somniferum and Friends © Harold Davis

Exposure data: Nikon D800, Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4, eight exposures shot on a light box, each exposure at f/11 and ISO 100, shutter speeds ranging from 1/40 of a second to 4 seconds, tripod mounted; exposures combined via layering and hand masking in Photoshop.

Making the Botanical Photo: If you are in the San Francisco area, I am presenting on this subject on Saturday June 7, 2014 at Photo Oakland. This is in conjunction with a “Best of Botanicals” exhibition, with print sales partially benefiting San Francisco Botanical Garden. My presentation at 3 PM is free of charge, but I do expect a crowd, so plan to arrive early. Click here for more info.

Photographing Flowers for Transparency: Due to many requests, I’ve just opened a new session of my weekend Photographing Flowers for Transparency workshop, scheduled for Saturday, October 4 and Sunday, October 5, 2014. The Papaver image that accompanies this post shows an example of utilizing this technique, and is the kind of image that is created in the workshop. This is a fun and popular event. Previous sessions have been attended by photographers from all over the world, and sold out quickly. Click here for more information and registration.