Category Archives: Flowers

Iris Trilogy

Sometimes simple is best!

Iris Trilogy © Harold Davis

Iris Trilogy © Harold Davis

Also posted in Photography

Flores Pano on Black, and on White

Et chorus sinit ire cum flores (black) © Harold Davis

Et chorus sinit ire cum flores (black) © Harold Davis

I’ve been doing a great deal of black and white work for my forthcoming book from Monacelli Press, so its nice to take a color break with a color image, even though the color is on black, and also on white—so color and black and white!

In times of trouble, both personal and for the world, what better to turn to than flowers? There’s nothing like spending time arranging, photographing, and processing a floral panorama to help with serenity and steady the nerves.

Roughly speaking, the image title translates from the Latin to “Let’s take flowers with us and dance!” If you check out the exposure and processing info below, you’ll see this is one floral dance that took a great deal of work. To quote the American poet Randall Jarrell, “Art being bartender is never drunk.”

Et chorus sinit ire cum flores (white) © Harold Davis

Et chorus sinit ire cum flores (white) © Harold Davis

Related image: Garden Party.

Exposure and processing info: Nikon D810, Zeiss Otus 1.4/55 ZF.2, photographed on a light box, eighteen exposures (photographed in two panels, left and right, each panel nine exposures with shutter speeds from 1/8 of a second to 15 seconds), each exposure at f/16 and ISO 64, tripod mounted; exposures converted from RAW using Adobe Camera RAW and Nik HDR Efex Pro, and combined in Photoshop; processed in Photoshop with help from Nik Color Efex Pro, Topaz Adjust, Topaz Simplify, and Topaz Glow; black version created using an LAB L-channel inversion in Photoshop.

Also posted in Photography

Sunflower

Sunflower on White in Black and White © Harold Davis

Sunflower on White in Black and White © Harold Davis

Also posted in Monochrome

Eschew the Routine

Yesterday was going to be a day of routine and mundane tasks: bookkeeping, workflow management, writing business emails, and so on. As a professional photographer and artist, this stuff has to get done! But looking out at the garden, I saw a fresh crop of red poppies and some blue clematis. I knew they were doomed as the day warmed-up, so making art with the floral material was a now-or-never proposition!

Clematis, Poppies, and Butterflies © Harold Davis

Clematis, Poppies, and Butterflies © Harold Davis

With Phyllis and the kids over at the Karate Dojo, in the cool air of the morning, I cranked the music up, and arranged and photographed the flowers on my light box. I do like to play in Photoshop as well as the camera! As the day got warmer and the kids came home filling the house with laughter and chatter and happy noise, I used LAB color to invert the image, and added some butterflies and a textured background. Altogether a happy day of play at home for me!

Also posted in Photography

Light Box Floral Fun with My iPhone

Here are two new floral images shot and processed with my iPhone. Both were initially processed in Snapseed. The upper image was then put through Plastic Bullet and Lo-Mob, with the frame added in Snapseed. The bottom image is a Waterlogue.

Floral Fun © Harold Davis

Floral Fun © Harold Davis

iPhone Light Box #3 © Harold Davis

iPhone Light Box #3 © Harold Davis

Also posted in iPhone

Study in Scarlet

In Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet, Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick Watson meet for the very first time and agree to share an apartment. As new roomies, Holmes proceeds to explain his “science” of deduction and analysis, all based on the importance of accurate observation, and in the context of that ultimate scarlet liquid, blood.

My own Study in Scarlet, shown below, draws on poppies and anemones for its chromatic reference rather than sanguine fluid. However, there is something about my image that should lead to analysis and deduction following careful observation. If you think you see what I am referencing, please drop me an email with the explanation.

Study in Scarlet © Harold Davis

Study in Scarlet © Harold Davis

Garden Party

The flowers in my garden decided to have a party. The Fourth of July Roses brought the noise makers and musical instruments. The irises brought the guacamole and dip. The Papaver somniferum brought, well, what poppies usually bring to a party. The tulips were pretty in pink, and they all got together and invited some exotic tulips from the store—whose frilly edges and bright orange and yellow colors added a touch of exotic, tropical pizzazz to the melange.

Garden Party © Harold Davis

Garden Party © Harold Davis

As night fell, the band played on, and the wild and crazy flower garden party got even more intense.

Garden Party Black © Harold Davis

Garden Party Black © Harold Davis

Also posted in Photography

Bougainvillea Variations

Bougainvillea Study II © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Study II © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation A © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation A © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation B © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation B © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation C © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation C © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation D © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation D © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation E

Bougainvillea Variation E © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation F © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation F © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation G © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation G © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation H © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation H © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation I © Harold Davis

Bougainvillea Variation I © Harold Davis

Also posted in Photograms

Matilija Poppies and Friends

The wonderful Matilija Poppies, Romneya coulteri, are in full bloom in the East Bay hills across the water from San Francisco, California. White, platter-sized translucent flowers dominate a tall stem on a bush-like construction, with an intricate yellow central flower core. The Matilija is a genuine native of the southwest United States and California, and grows like a weed. Shown here with Echinacea and Clematis from our garden (the blue Clematis is hidden behind the more frontal Matilija).

© Harold Davis

Matilija Poppies and Friends on Black © Harold Davis

© Harold Davis

Matilija Poppies and Friends on Paper © Harold Davis

© Harold Davis

Matilija Poppies and Friends on White © Harold Davis

Top: On black, via LAB conversion; middle: placed on a paper background in post-production; bottom: photographed on a light box.

Related image: Peonies.

Peonies

Peonies on Black © Harold Davis

Peonies on Black © Harold Davis

Peonies on a Scanned Paper Background © Harold Davis

Peonies on a Scanned Paper Background © Harold Davis

Peonies on White © Harold Davis

Peonies on White © Harold Davis

Peonies on White (bottom) is a photo composite created from 18 individual 36MP captures on a light box photographed for transparency. Peonies on Black (top) is an LAB L-channel adjustment (an inversion) of the image on white. Peonies on a Scanned Paper Background (middle) shows the white version added to a background that was created by scanning a somewhat aged sheet of paper..

Remains of the Clematis

What happens when the bloom on the clematis fades? When the leaves fall off, and all that is left is the wabi-sabi of the central flower core?

Remains of the Clematis © Harold Davis

Remains of the Clematis © Harold Davis

Shown here photographed on a light box, in Photoshop converted to monochromatic, and duplicated—with the duplicate L-channel inverted in LAB color to substitute white for black, and black for white.

Also posted in Monochrome, Photography

Back to the Flowers

I’ve been in Europe (rural southwestern France, and then Paris) for most of the past month, which has blissfully enabled me to avoid American politics. Except when I admitted to someone that I was American, in which case loud laughter and pointing commenced. Followed (after the second bottle of wine) by the lachrymose admission that things were just as bad locally.

© Harold Davis

The Wild and the Tame © Harold Davis

So coming home I do feel that I’ve slipped into Bad Biff’s alternative universe in Back to the Future Part II, with he-who-shall-not-be-named all too likely to become our new overlord. The only defense to this mass insanity is to practice Back to the Flowers as a viable alternative to Back to the Future.

Also posted in Photography

Recent Flower Images

Before I leave for France later this week I wanted to blog a few of my recent flower photos. Enjoy!

Clematis 'Bees Jubilee' and 'Daniel Deronda' © Harold Davis

Clematis ‘Bees Jubilee’ and ‘Daniel Deronda’ © Harold Davis

Clematis 'Bees Jubilee' and 'Daniel Deronda' Color Inversion © Harold Davis

Clematis ‘Bees Jubilee’ and ‘Daniel Deronda’ Color Inversion © Harold Davis

Clematis 1 © Harold Davis

Clematis 1 © Harold Davis

Tulips Are for Peeking © Harold Davis

Tulips Are for Peeking © Harold Davis

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl

Ranunculi is the plural of ranunculus and I think makes a better plural for this wonderful flower than “ranunculuses.” By whatever plural form, Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl forms the third of a trio of blossoms-in-a-blue-bowl imagery. The other two images are shown in Orchids in a Blue Bowl and Clematis in a Blue Bowl, and are also shown in this story beneath my ranunculi.

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl© Harold Davis

Ranunculi in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Orchids in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Orchids in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Clematis in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Clematis in a Blue Bowl © Harold Davis

Also posted in Photography

Kerry’s Bouquet

It’s a great pleasure to have a surprise bouquet of flowers show up on our front porch—perhaps particularly when one has really done nothing to merit the sumptuous arrangement. If one is then compelled to partially deconstruct the floral arrangement to create a composition on one’s light box, well then, I am afraid that is what flowers can expect when they enter my environs—and I can only assure the donor of the flowers that the flowers did their duty in what I believe to be a good cause. Perhaps the flowers may find consolation in Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 (“So long lives this and this gives life to thee”) along the floral route to immortality.

Kerry's Bouquet © Harold Davis

Kerry’s Bouquet © Harold Davis

Interested in how I made this image? Please consider my Photographing Flowers for Transparency workshop.