Category Archives: Models

Many Hands Make Light Work

Finger and Hand Study 1 © Harold Davis

Finger and Hand Study 1 © Harold Davis

Finger and Hand Study 2 © Harold Davis

Finger and Hand Study 2 © Harold Davis

Totem and Taboo

The title I’ve given this image, Totem and Taboo, is in part a reference to Sigmund Freud’s collection of essays of the same name. Freud combined anthropology with concepts of psychoanalysis to compare the states of mind of “savages” with those of neurotics. My image makes no such grandiose claims, but visually it does seem to represent animism and a totem (the pole that is, if not in the totemic animal sense).

Totem and Taboo © Harold Davis

Totem and Taboo © Harold Davis

Totem and Taboo is a single in-camera multiple exposure that the model and I choreographed. Although the model is different, I processed the image to pair with Gates after Rodin. If you are curious, my blog story about Gates after Rodin has a more detailed description of how this kind of image is made.

Also posted in Photography

Changing Focal Lengths in a Multiple Exposure

Over more than a year, I’ve been working on a series of in-camera multiple exposure images using models in a studio and strobes. Generally, my approach has been to make the exposures with my camera fixed on a tripod, often with a prime lens, and definitely at a fixed focal length. But what happens when I take the camera off the tripod, move the camera position around, and vary the focal length while the model moves into different poses? One answer to this question is Obeisance, shown below, with eight exposures at several focal lengths, from various vantage points, shows both the back and the front of the model at the same time.

Obeisance © Harold Davis

Obeisance © Harold Davis

Related stories: Three Graces; New Phylum; Hekatonkheires; Pagan Goddess; Falling; A Rorschach for MFAs; Multiple Exposures.

Three Graces

The Three Graces are actually a three-in-one trinity: this is one model (Anastasia Arteyeva), via an in-camera multiple exposure.

Three Graces © Harold Davis

Three Graces © Harold Davis

Processed for the distinctive—almost cave painting look—using the Da Vinci filter in the Topaz Impression plug-in.

Related image (same model): And now for something completely different.

And now for something completely different…

This is an in-camera double exposure I made on Saturday. The model is Anastasia Arteyeva.

Shelter Within © Harold Davis

Shelter Within © Harold Davis

Related images: View more of my Multiple Exposures (slide show).

Also posted in Monochrome

Arms

Arms © Harold Davis

Arms © Harold Davis

Four in-camera exposures, with the model stationary besides her arms. Related stories: Pagan Goddess, Multiple Exposures.

Also posted in Photography

New Phylum

Insectum humaneae © Harold Davis

Insectum humaneae © Harold Davis

Related images: Hekatonkheires; Pagan Goddess.

Also posted in Photography

Hekatonkheires

This image, derived from a single in-camera multiple exposure, plays homage to the Hekatonkheires, a race of hundred-handed giants in Greek mythology. In the popular Rick Riordan young adult fantasy The Battle of the Labyrinth, the character Briares is the last of the hundred-handed giants.

Hekatonkheires © Harold Davis

Hekatonkheires © Harold Davis

Related image: Pagan Goddess.

Pagan Goddess

With flowers beginning to burst forth in my neighborhood with all their sensual energy my thoughts turn “naturally” to the passion of nature. Nature is wonderful, nature can be fearsome, and as I have learned, nature can be utterly indifferent. When you are in its grip, indifferent nature simply doesn’t care if you live or die. I once wrote a story on this topic, Does the Wilderness Care about Me?with the answer to the question a resounding “No.” The wilderness does not care, it just is.

Pagan Dreams  © Harold Davis

Pagan Dreams © Harold Davis

These aspects of nature—beauty, awe, fear, and indifference—are like those I feel in the presence of a truly beautiful woman.

Of course, beautiful women are part of nature. But there’s a reason that many religions portray strange women deities as a force of nature, and (alternatively) a source of fear and delight. I’ve tried to show this in my Multiple Exposures series, combined with twisted and contorted mash-up references to great moments in art history.

The model and co-choreographer of this image is the talented Zoe West.

Related stories: A Rorschach for MFAs; Multiple Exposures.

Also posted in Photography

Dasha

I photographed the beautiful model Dasha as part of my Multiple Exposures sequence in Variations, I never know which me, Quo Vadis and Dance of the Seven Veils. I was asked recently whether I had any images of Dasha that weren’t part of a multiple exposure sequence. Well, of course I do. This one was supposed to be part of a multiple exposure, but I forgot to set the camera to combine the images, so I got eight individual exposures—also explaining the in-motion look of the model.

Dasha © Harold Davis

Dasha © Harold Davis

Exposure and post-production information: Photographed against a black background using studio strobes, Nikon D810, Otus 55mm f/1.4, at 1/160 of a second and f/8 using ISO 100, post-processed to black & white using Nik Silver Efex Pro and the Infrared preset as a Photoshop Black & White Adjustment Layer. I then added Flypaper Etched Copper from the Metallic collection as a texture overlay, and reconverted (converted a second time) to black and white.

Also posted in Monochrome, Photography

Variations

Here are some variations on I never know which me. The upper variation has been flipped, and a texture added to make the model appear to be coming out of the background. The lower variation has been converted to black and white.

Pygmalion Redux © Harold Davis

Pygmalion Redux © Harold Davis

This is an in-camera multiple exposure, consisting of ten individual exposures combined in the camera. I used a Nikon D810 mounted on a tripod with a Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 lens. The background was black seamless paper, and two studio strobes triggered by wireless were used for lighting.

Black and White Variation  © Harold Davis

Black and White Variation © Harold Davis

For the entire cycle of images see Multiple Exposures.

Credits—Model: DashaStudio: The Lighthouse Berkeley.

Also posted in Photography

I never know which me

This is an in-camera multiple exposure, consisting of ten individual exposures combined in the camera. I used a Nikon D810 mounted on a tripod with a Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 lens. The background was black seamless paper, and two studio strobes triggered by wireless were used for lighting.

I never know which me © Harold Davis

I never know which me © Harold Davis

Related image: Quo Vadis. For the entire cycle of images see Multiple Exposures.

Credits—Model: DashaStudio: The Lighthouse Berkeley.

Quo Vadis

This is ten in-camera multiple exposures, with the camera and tripod mounted on a ladder looking down at the model on a black background. I asked the model to think about being photographing from above, and to be careful about the perimeters of the area the camera captured.

Quo Vadis © Harold Davis

Quo Vadis © Harold Davis

This is an issue of collaborative, synchronized and choreographed photography, as the model and I both need to keep track of the photos, and make sure that each one of the exposures going into the multiple exposures going into the in-camera multiple exposure is interestingly and attractively posed and positioned.

Related image: Dance of the Seven Veils.

Credits—Model: DashaStudio: The Lighthouse Berkeley.

Dance of the Seven Veils

When Salome danced for King Herod, there’s some controversy about the number of veils she used in her dance. But there is no controversy in these images: I created them with one beautiful woman and one piece of white fabric and in-camera multiple exposures on a black background. The composition was not changed in Photoshop, although I did routine cropping and processing, and added a texture.

Dance of the Seven Veils #266 © Harold Davis

Dance of the Seven Veils #266 © Harold Davis

Dance of the Seven Veils #267 © Harold Davis

Dance of the Seven Veils #267 © Harold Davis

You can see some of the other images I’ve made using similar techniques in these stories: FallingWheel of LifeDance in the RingsA Rorschach for MFAs and Multiple Exposures. Also check out the Multiple Exposures portfolio page of these images!

Credits

Model: the talented and lovely Dasha. Studio: The Lighthouse Berkeley.

Falling

Falling is a single, in-camera multiple exposure using the Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 and a Nikon D800 on a tripod. There was a black backdrop, and I used a studio strobe on either side, facing the model who was posing on a suspended hoop. The mechanics of in-camera multiple-exposure photography aren’t too tough to master provided auto-gain is enabled. But creating these images does require precision choreography and communication with the model to get the posing positions right, otherwise the composition doesn’t come together.

Falling © Harold Davis

Falling © Harold Davis

You can see some of the other images I’ve made using this technique in these stories: Wheel of LifeDance in the RingsA Rorschach for MFAs and Multiple Exposures. Also check out the Multiple Exposures portfolio page of these images!

Also posted in Photography