In a Blue Hour

Over the weekend on Saturday I led a fun workshop sponsored by the Point Reyes Field Institute on Point Reyes photographing Waves. I had some very enthusiastic participants and I think we all had a good time. It was fun to be leading a workshop so close to home compared to my recent travels, and there is no doubt that Point Reyes National Seashore is a visual resource and national park second to none, no matter how far one might roam.

In a Blue Hour © Harold Davis

In a Blue Hour © Harold Davis

I was able to make some of my own images during the course of the workshop, and I found that this year I was mainly interested in created abstractions using longish exposures and motion. The top image, In a Blue Hour, was a ten second exposure, with my camera on tripod. Here’s the full exposure data: 44mm lens, circular polarizer, 10 seconds at f/29 and ISO 200, tripod mounted.

Wave Study © Harold Davis

Wave Study © Harold Davis

Wave Study in Color © Harold Davis

Wave Study in Color © Harold Davis

The two versions of Wave Study (above) were shot handheld at 1/2 a second. I stopped the camera down to f/22 and used both a polarizer and a neutral density filter to enable the longish exposure despite the day light. The full exposure data is: 300mm, circular polarizer combined with +4 neutral density filter, 1/2 of a second at f/22 and ISO 31, hand held.

Stormy Sea, Point Reyes © Harold Davis

Stormy Sea, Point Reyes © Harold Davis

Stormy Sea, Point Reyes (above), was also shot hand held. The full exposure data is: 150mm, circular polarizer combined with +4 neutral density filter, 0.6 of a second at f/29 and ISO 31, hand held.

Related stories from some of the previous Waves workshops in years gone by: Photographing Waves (2014); Photographing Waves (2011); also Faces of the Deep.

 

This entry was posted in Landscape, Photography, Point Reyes.

One Comment

  1. Mauro December 11, 2015 at 5:22 am #

    Wow! Harold, the “in the blue hour” picture is one of the nicest I’ve ever seen! Many compliments!

One Trackback

  1. By Five Minute Wave Exposures on December 12, 2016 at 9:16 am

    […] the long exposure time performs a kind of mathematical role, and reduces the random chaos of the storm-tossed inter-tidal zone to the basic overall patterns, teasing out consistency where nature produces apparent […]

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*